#1
Hi, ive been playing acoustic for about a year, i learned the basic chords such a E, Em, D, Dm, A, Am, G, etc. I have a beginer acoustic, its a fender squier. I have a few questions, if you could please give me detailed answers, i really appreciate it.

1. I have trouble with some chords such as, F, Gm, Gm7, etc. Chords like that. My fingers just simply wont stretch. Im a 16 year old female, with short fingers. Any suggestions? If i practice will they stretch over time? Any way to make them stretch? lol.


2. I usually play at the 2nd bar on my guitar, chords and such. I watch people on youtube play acoustic and they switch between bars for different notes, to get different sounds. How will I know when to switch bars?

3. I want to get an electric. I was thinking no were over $250 for one. Whats a good one to get for a beginner? Are the fender squier packs any good?

4. I strum, how do i pick? like fingering the chords, if thats what you call it lol. I never got how to do that.

Thanks so much for answering my questions. I would love if everyone who can help me out, answer them. I am self taught. And i would like to stay that way, and improve at my own pace, so please don't recommend guitar lessons. Thanks so much!
#2
1. Keep working at the chords, especially barre chords (such as an F). Because your fingers may not be used to moving in certain ways, practice those chords a lot. Keep practicing and the stretching will become easier over time as your hand muscles adapt and strengthen.

2. I'm assuming you mean frets instead of bars- each fret is a different note, so if you want to get a sense of how these work, learn a few scales. I'd start with major and minor, and maybe learn some music theory so you can see how notes and scales apply to the guitar. Also, experiment with playing certain notes and see if you can create something you like.

3. The Fender Squier packs will work fine for a beginner- there are a couple of good Epiphone LP packs too, like this: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Epiphone-Les-Paul-Special-II-and-Amp-Pack?sku=513150

4. If you mean fingerpicking, just specific fingers for certain strings, for example if you had a chord like:
E 2
B 3
G 2
D 0

you would use your index finger to pick the E strings, middle for the B, ring for G, and pinky for D.
#3
1. some of those chords are barre chords, so yah their alot harder, as for the other ones, practice is the ol rule

2. i have no idea what your talkign about lol

3. meh squiers are usually frowned upon, yamaha pacifica maybe, or an ibanex grx20 (a bit more metal)

4. normally your thumb is used to pick the top 3 strings (E A D) and you index, middle, and ring finger are used to pick the G B and e strings

Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus-Top, SH-2 and SH-5
Ibanez GRX20
Baron Acoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Roland Cube 15
Dunlop Crybaby From Hell
Dunlop GCB-95 Crybaby
Boss MT-2 Metal Zone
Boss PH-3 Phase Shifter
Boss BF-3 Flanger
#4
1. I have trouble with some chords such as, F, Gm, Gm7, etc. Chords like that. My fingers just simply wont stretch. Im a 16 year old female, with short fingers. Any suggestions? If i practice will they stretch over time? Any way to make them stretch? lol.

-They won't stretch if you aren't stretching them. Try

e------------------------------1-3
B-------------------------1-3-----
G--------------------1-3----------
D---------------1-3---------------
A---------1--3--------------------
E-----1-3-------------------------


Use your first and 2nd finger, then 2nd and 3rd, then 3rd and forth. And you also might need to push your fingers in opposite directions a little everyday to get em to stretch.


2. I usually play at the 2nd bar on my guitar, chords and such. I watch people on youtube play acoustic and they switch between bars for different notes, to get different sounds. How will I know when to switch bars?

-You might be talking about barre chords. They are much harder then regular chords and if you can't stretch yet don't worry about them.


3. I want to get an electric. I was thinking no were over $250 for one. Whats a good one to get for a beginner? Are the fender squier packs any good?

-I wouldn't go for a starter pack. The amps usually break and are bad quality. I would buy a Roland Microcube for an amp, or maybe a cheaper peavy or frontman.

Squires are alrite starters, but you might grow out of it fast.


4. I strum, how do i pick? like fingering the chords, if thats what you call it lol. I never got how to do that.

Thumb - 6th, 5th , 4th string
Index - 3rd string
Middle - 2nd string
Ring finger - 1st

Of course you can use your pinky but that is the most common way

Hope this helps
#5
what finger do i put on the E string for the F# Chord ?
My thumb or index? what ways the easiest?

also i dont think i really understand scales. I looked at the scale converter thing on someones post, and it made no sence to me. It was a bunch of dots really. can someone who has time please explain in full detail?

For the picking, when i pick do i just go down the strings of the chords with the finger its assigned to, or is there a certain pattern of picking?

and one more question sorry, but is there alternative chords to play in replace of certain barre chords. Its hard for me to cover two strings with one finger.

Thanks so much for your help so far guys
it really means alot to me, and is helping me too.
#6
When finger picking you kind of just pull the string with your finger. It really is as simple as that. But make sure you're using your finger to pull it and not your wrist.

For finger picking chords you play the root note then you play your 1st, then 2nd, then 3rd finer.

So if you were playing a G major chord, you use your thumb for the G in the E string. (3rd fret) then pluck 1-2-3 fingers in that order.


There is alternate chords, but they are barre chords as well =p. If you practice barres you will get them eventually don't worry.
#7
I'll see if I can explain scales as simply as I can, I would suggest learning some music theory whether or not you understand this, it'll serve you well.

Intervals are the building blocks of music- an interval is the distance between two notes. The two easiest ones to learn are the half step and whole step, and you can apply these to your guitar.

Each fret you move up or down represents one half step, for example if you play the note C (8th fret on the E string) and move to the 7th fret, you have the note B, a half step down. If you move to the 9th fret, you have C#, a half step up.

Scales are based off simple formulas of intervals. The seven notes are represented by letters:
A B C D E F G

A major scale is constructed with these intervals: root (the note you start on), whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step. So for a C major scale, we start at C. Moving a whole step up (two frets on the guitar, try this out) we reach D. Another two frets and we arrive at E. Now we move a half step, just one fret, and we have F. Another whole step is G, then another whole step to get to A, yet another whole step to reach B, and finally a half step to get to C. So the scale looks like this:

C D E F G A B C

Playing this on the guitar on either E string, play these frets:

8 10 12 13 15 17 19 20

and that's your C major scale. Use the same formula (whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half) to construct any major scale. After familiarizing yourself with majors, construct minor scales with the following intervals:

(root, whole, half, whole, whole, half, whole, whole)

so for example an A minor scale would be:

A B C D E F G A

Does that clear anything up?