#1
in my quest for better understanding of music theory i came across these chords and it occoured to me although i know stuff about them (such as it sounds better when they resolve to the root of the progression etc) i dont actually know how to form them on the fretboard, i know the basic major, minor and 7th shapes that can be slid up and down, and i was wondering if anyone could give me the shapes for diminished chords and augmented chords... and any other shapes i may find usefull.

i did have a look in the all chords tab but it seems to only have different forms of the diminished cords e.g. Bdim/A

thanks in advance

Schnips
#2
Cdim:

E---5---
B---4---
G---5---
D---4---
A--------
e--------
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#3
Quote by Kramer1309
Cdim:

E---5---
B---4---
G---5---
D---4---
A--------
e--------


or Gb dim or Eb dim or A dim
#4
Here's are a few forms of Fdim7:

e--4--7--10--13-----7-----------
B--3--6--9---12--9--9-----------
G--4--7--10--13--7--7-----------
D--3--6--9---12--9--X-----------
A----------------8--8-----------
E-------------------------------


There's a really neat trick you can do with these chords. Lower each note by one semitone, one at a time, and check out the chords you get:

e--4--4--4--4--3----------
B--3--3--3--2--3----------
G--4--4--3--4--4----------
D--3--2--3--3--3----------
A-------------------------
E-------------------------

The chords you get, respectively, are: Fdim7, E7, Bb7, Db7, and G7. Try performing this trick with all the forms of Fdim7 that you know.

If you happen to raise each note instead of lowering it, you can get these chords:

e--4--4--4--4--5----------
B--3--3--3--4--3----------
G--4--4--5--4--4----------
D--3--4--3--3--3----------
A-------------------------
E-------------------------

The first chord is again Fdim7.
The second could be considered either a Bm6, G#m7b5, or a rootless voicing of E9.
The third could be considered Fm6, Dm7b5, or a rootless voicing of Bb9.
The fourth could be considered Abm6, Fm7b5, or a rootless voicing of Db9.
The fifth could be considered Dm6, Bm7b5, or a rootless voicing of G9.

You can do similar things with augmented triads, as well. If you take an augmented triad and lower each note individually, you derive three major triads. If you raise each note individually you derive the relative minor triads of those major triads. Here are some forms:

e---4--4--4--3--4--4--5---
B---5--5--4--5--5--6--5---
G---5--4--5--5--6--5--5---
D-------------------------
A-------------------------
E-------------------------

The order here is Caug, Emajor, Abmajor, Cmajor, C#minor, Fminor, Aminor.

Figure the rest out on your own.
#5
I think the most important thing you can learn about diminished and augmented triads is that there is only really 3 of each.....

All diminished and augmented triad inversions form another diminished or augmented chord respectively
#6
^ Only true with dim7 chords, not dim triads. Also, there are 4 distinct augmented chords (if there were only 3 then there would only be 9 notes accounted for).
#8
A great song for diminished chords is 'Tears In The Rain' by Joe Satriani. At the very end of the song there is a decending chord progression which are all dimished 7th shapes, and he goes across all the strings, ao you'll be able to learn all the shapes on all the string sets. The tab is on this site.

What is so clever about music (especially with dimished 7th's) is that you can substitute each of the notes in the chord and treat it as the root. You then create the same chord from that root, but it will still contain the same notes as the first diminished 7th you just played. As a result, there are only three dimished chords in the whole of music!!

Ab dim7, A dim7 and Bb dim 7 (Think these are right...correct me if I'm wrong)

A great example of this is the ascending diminished 7th arpeggio section in Satriani's 'Big Bad Moon'.
#9
A great song for diminished chords is 'Tears In The Rain' by Joe Satriani. At the very end of the song there is a decending chord progression which are all dimished 7th shapes, and he goes across all the strings, ao you'll be able to learn all the shapes on all the string sets. The tab is on this site.

What is so clever about music (especially with dimished 7th's) is that you can substitute each of the notes in the chord and treat it as the root. You then create the same chord from that root, but it will still contain the same notes as the first diminished 7th you just played. As a result, there are only three dimished chords in the whole of music!!

Ab dim7, A dim7 and Bb dim 7 (Think these are right...correct me if I'm wrong)

A great example of this is the ascending diminished 7th arpeggio section in Satriani's 'Big Bad Moon'.