#1
Not really been playing long, took up guitar just after summer last year. I normally manage to practice for at least an hour most days, usually manage to get quite a bit more practice than that. I normally practice quite slowly, bout 60bpm or so, playing scales, chromatics with occassional tab stuff thrown in to keep it varied.

However, it just seems that for a while, I dont seem to have got any more accurate or quick. Its hard to keep doing the same stuff when everyone says "keep at it, speed and accuracy comes with practice" - yet it seems like ive hit a glass ceiling really early, and its bloody annoying! LOL

Anyone else have a problem like that when they started?
#2
Well start by learning simple songs? If i played scales all day i would get bored too..
#3
go for a faster tempo... and don't just play scales and stuff.. play songs you like..
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#4
Yeah, you really need to play songs, **** YOU want to play. I was thinking the other day, that I would never be in a band and be, I dunno, half decent, if I would have continually practiced with methods that were boring or I didn't like, like repetitive scales and stuff. And it doesn't exactly have to be an easy song. You can learn the intro of One if you're a beginner and feel like you've really accomplished something, if Metallica's your thing or whatev...
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#5
try and play the scales and stuff you know at slightly faster speeds, this will strengthen you hand and increase your speed, not at first but after practicing that speed. Also everyone and a while try and learn something different like a lick or riff and practice it.

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#6
Thanks for the replies.

Been learning a few riffs from Creed songs (AND I own a Line 6 Spider, thus becoming the most despised person on the forum LOL), which is good at keeping it different every time I practice. Im not at the stage where I dont enjoy it, I love playing the gee-tahr, but its frustrating when I bump up the metronome and still peak about the same bpm

Got a program the other day called Guitar Speed Trainer that runs you through various exercises - anyone rate it, or is it wank?
#7
you seem to be worrying far too much about speed - forget it, it's not important. If you concentrate on playing accurately and cleanly you'll gradually get faster. The most important thing is to get playing some songs, nobody takes up guitar to play scales so why spend so much time on them?
Actually called Mark!

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#9
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nobody takes up guitar to play scales so why spend so much time on them?


fret wanking LOL

good point though. Shall persist and see what happens Maybe expecting a bit much as one of the first songs I decided to learn was Laid To Rest by L.o.G. :S
#10
I started for a month or so, quit for like 6 months, started playing again for the last couple months - started seeing some improvement and now I really like playing.
#11
Quote by Gabbastard
fret wanking LOL

good point though. Shall persist and see what happens Maybe expecting a bit much as one of the first songs I decided to learn was Laid To Rest by L.o.G. :S


If you want to progress then you really have to start at the beginning, trying something that's too difficult just results in you hitting a brick wall...you get frustrated and you don't actually learn or achieve anything. Just start with simple chordy songs and gradually move up to easy riff based stuff and you'll naturally progress to faster, more intricate things.
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#13
You need to break up your routine to keep things interesting. I would continue to practice scales, chromatics and chords, but you have to throw in some songs or it just gets boring. Funny thing, I've owned the computer program Guitar Pro for a long time, and I used it primarily for printing free music from this site, but just recently I started to play along with it and it's amazing. You can slow down a song and/or isolate hard parts and have them repeat. It's helping me learn the solos on Iron Man. If you have a computer, I recommend getting a Vox Amplug and connecting your computers sound output into it. It's the perfect home practice setup.
#15
if u wanna learn how to become faster with your scales learn an easy solo that goes through a few of the scales...that way your learning them but also playing a sick tune...so youll wanna get better and faster at playing that tune to get better at it....learn a few solos like that then come back to ur scales and i guarentee youll be alot faster at them
#16
Hi
Heres my method - and what I tell my students.
#1 -
warm up slowly with excersises and scales - I prefer chromatics to start with alternating between 16th and triplets - 30% of your practice time

#2
work on what you want to be playing - another words - the newest thing in your repetoire - you cant play it any way - and so thats ok - it will get better - again - 30% of your practice time

# 3

now play the things you can play - this should be fun - cause you are warmed up - and feeling good - and can play - again - 30% of your practice time

NOW YOU SHOULD BE FEELING GREAT!! AND PLYING GREAT!!!!


I know - what you were thinking - what to do with the last 10%

anything you want - be creative or go back to playing the stuff you can play.

If you follow this method - it will be easy to achieve more.

And I'll explain it this way

if you try to play the music you can play when you were warmed up - and are not now - you wont play it very well - and will be discouraged - and from there go to what you are trying to learn - and cant play - you will be more discouraged - and then you wonrt even want to try scales etc... kinda like an athlete going out cold - un warmed up - playing bad - and then trying to excercise

hope that helps
#17
Here is a question for you. In the beginning when I couln't "make music" with my guitar I concentrated on learning chords and techniques etc. Now that I am starting to be able to learn songs and play them correctly I am spending most of my practice time learning songs. I still am learning and practicing scales etc, but for the last couple of weeks I have been concentrating on the songs and devote most of my time to it. Basically I will work on scales for say 30 min a day and then spend 2 hours a day trying to learn a song. I've been feeling pretty guilty about not "practicing" although I think I must be getting better as I learn to play more songs. Is learning songs the same as practicing as long as you are not playing parts you have perfected? Hopefully my question makes sense...
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#18
it's like paul gilbert said. when you're first learning you should learn chords and songs based off those chords cause you're playing music. it beats just doing chromatics.