#1
hi,I am a complete beginner to recording.At the moment I do not have good gear for recording so quality is suffering,but until i can afford the proper gear i would like to gain some knowledge on the subject.I have some newbie questions >1.What is Latency? 2.What is ideal volume to hit in reaper?(i'm guessing in the red is too loud) 3.When should you record in mono and when in stereo? 4.Are songs recorded with each track individually in mono then panned to the left and right and volumes for each track adjusted? 5.What is compression? 6.What is Noise Gate? and 7.What types of things will a pro in a studio do after all the tracks are laid down to give it the pro touch? I have alot of questions in there any answers appreciated excuse my stupidity but i have virtually no clue about recording!!!!
#2
Quote by Allycuk
hi,I am a complete beginner to recording.At the moment I do not have good gear for recording so quality is suffering,but until i can afford the proper gear i would like to gain some knowledge on the subject.I have some newbie questions >1.What is Latency? 2.What is ideal volume to hit in reaper?(i'm guessing in the red is too loud) 3.When should you record in mono and when in stereo? 4.Are songs recorded with each track individually in mono then panned to the left and right and volumes for each track adjusted? 5.What is compression? 6.What is Noise Gate? and 7.What types of things will a pro in a studio do after all the tracks are laid down to give it the pro touch? I have alot of questions in there any answers appreciated excuse my stupidity but i have virtually no clue about recording!!!!



Wow, gosh. That is quite a lot of questions. May I suggest that you have a good sift through tweakz guide at www.tweakheadz.com?

Meanwhile, I'll briefly go through some of these.

1. Latency is basically lagging, or delay. For example, when recording with a stock soundcard, you might find that everything you play is recorded slightly after, with a delay. Obviously this will make it very hard for you to keep in time when playing overdubs and such, and will most likely ruin your recording. That's not a great explanation but it should give you an idea.

2. Don't hit the red. Basically go with the colours. If it's red or orange, it's a bit too loud for comfort and may clip.

3. Generally, for guitar, record in mono. Record in stereo if you have two mics set up to capture a stereo image.

4. Often, yes. Especially in home studios.

5. Compression reduces the volume of a track over a certain level which you determine. It basically is used to reduce the dynamic range of a track, so you don't get a guitar that's really quiet on the verse, before blowing your eardrums out on the chorus. Again, that's a rough definition, you'll want to read up on it.

6. A noise gate cuts out sound below a certain level which you determine, thus can be used to cut out guitar hum when notes are not being playing, cleaning up the track. This is only one use of a gate, and again a rough definition.

7. Adjust levels, panning, apply high end software and hardware plug ins such as reverb and other effects, apply compression, noise gating, edit the tracks, plus loads of other tricks. This answer to this question could fill several books.

Well, I didn't explain them as in depth as I could have, but it's getting late and I just wanted to give you a rough idea. I strongly suggest you take a look at tweakz guide though.
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#3
Awesome!!thanks for answering all of those I had a rough idea but kinda wanted to make sure especially about layering(better to ask if your not 100% sure)thank you very much for providing the tweakheadz guide I'm of to have a read at it now