#1
I have been interested in learning specifically how to sing along while harmonizing with someone else. My question is thus: what are common vocal harmonies used by musicians? I can pick out fifths and octaves fairly well, and am working on other intervals, but usually songs don't use fifths for harmonies. I know this may not be the right forum, but this seemed the most correct.
#4
Your saying a Major 2nd then?
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#5
Quote by FlyingPooooo
Your saying a Major 2nd then?
Noooooo. Major second harmony is not common. The notes are too close together.

TS, I read a wiki article about vocal harmonization a few days ago that I remember being quite good. I suggest searching for it under "vocal harmony."

Edit: Bah, I can't find it.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Feb 26, 2008,
#7
Sweet, thanks you guys. I was thinking it was harmonized thirds, I just can't tell a third harmony yet. Also, concerning harmonized guitars such as Boston (for example) or Avenged Sevenfold (I think, I don't know their music, just that they have two guitarists); what would you normally do for that, like harmonized thirds or fourths or something. Thanks again in advance.
#8
^I know Iron Maiden does a lot of thirds, so I would imagine A7x doing the same. Boston's stuff if probably more complex, but thirds are likely common in their music as well.

One quick note about harmony is the difference between harmonizing in diatonic thirds vs. parallel major/minor thirds. Take a lick A C G E F G A-pure A minor. A parallel major third harmony would be C# E B G# A B C# and a parallel minor third harmony would be C Eb Bb G Ab Bb C. Both of those contain notes not in the A minor scale. Diatonic harmony means that you play whichever note fits in the scale, so a diatonic thirds harmony would be C E B G A B C. Distonic harmony is more common, but feel free to experiment. Additionally, diatonic harmony can be done with any interval, not just thirds.
#10
Ah, for some reason I associated flat third as Major 2nd. ='[ I need sleep.
-Gear-
Mesa Triple Rectifier---Bogner/Line6 SpiderValve---Orange PPC 4x12

-Pedalboard/Rackmount-
Alesis MidiVerb4--BBE SonicMaximizer 442--Ibanez TS9
Boss DD-3--Morley Mark Tremonti Wah

-Guitars-
Ibanez ART-100
Ibanez S-470
#12
Also, don't feel like you need one of the guitars to play the higher notes the whole time, while the other one stays underneath it. If the two guitars have different tones or are using different effect pedals then it can sound pretty cool if they switch registers a few times.

And don't feel like you need to stick them in straight diatonic thirds. It might give the effect that you are going for, but it could get very boring if it is that way the entire song. Try going between thirds and fourths, and occasionally drop down to a second if you want that tension.

Edit: And don't forget about inversions. If you're playing a fourth, then it will tend to make the higher of the two notes more noticeable, as a fourth could be thought of as an inverted fifth, and a fifth is more consonant than a fourth. The same goes with thirds and sixths (minor 3rd inverted = major 6th, and major 3rd inverted = minor 6th) and seconds and sevenths (same minor-major relationship). Major intervals are more consonant than minors, so you could think of a minor third as being an inverted major sixth, or a minor seventh as being an inverted major second.

Using that info, you should be able to come up with some interesting guitar harmonies.
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Last edited by seedmole at Feb 27, 2008,