#1
Well I've been playing guitar for a year and a half and I've changed strings out but I've never really deviated from GHS Boomers. I just remember when I first started, the guitarist that inspired me to play, Mark Morton from Lamb Of God, used them so I just picked 'em up. But yeah, I want to check out other strings, but here's the thing.. I don't really know what different strings make and what different types there are. I always hear stuff like "light top, heavy bottom" or "bright strings", what does all that mean? What difference do difference do different strings make. What difference the the gauge make?
#2
The gauge is how thick the strings are. The thicker they are, the harder they'll be t play. 'Skinny Top Heavy Bottom' is an Ernie Ball set of .10-.52.
How 'bright' they are is a tonal factor, and some companies like D'addario make different sets out of slightly different materials for different tonal qualities.
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#3
Quote by Ichimaru
The gauge is how thick the strings are. The thicker they are, the harder they'll be t play. 'Skinny Top Heavy Bottom' is an Ernie Ball set of .10-.52.
How 'bright' they are is a tonal factor, and some companies like D'addario make different sets out of slightly different materials for different tonal qualities.


So what's the advantage of thicker strings, if any? Is that all Skinny Top Heavy Bottom refers to? If so, are there any terms like that which describe some other common strings?
#4
yes, i mostly used d'addario strings, i think they have more good tones than other strings, but its depent on your ear
#5
Thicker strings generally give a thicker tone, whereas thinner ones tend to sound a little measly. As your fingers get stronger, you'll tend to prefer thicker strings to thinner ones and different sizes are better for different styles of playing.
Its mainly Enrie Ball who give their different gauges different names, with 'Extra Slinky' being their thinnest at .8-.38 and 'Not Even Slinky' the thickest at .12-.56.
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#6
Oh okay and between different brands, which ones are usually prefferred and popular? Do any string brands have any significance over the other?

I've heard Adam Jones uses Ernie and Mark Morton uses GHS Boomers... are those like the two most popular? Or is there something else?
#7
BFMV n Gallows use rotosounds but i think those are kinda crappy

Slipknot n Mastodon use D'Addarios

Pink Floyd n Firewind use Elixirs but these are coated so might not suit

Zakk Wylde n Trivium use Dunlops
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#8
How do Elixirs tend to sound?

EDIT: And does the coating make any difference other than string life?
#9
Quote by Nikon87
Oh okay and between different brands, which ones are usually prefferred and popular? Do any string brands have any significance over the other?

I've heard Adam Jones uses Ernie and Mark Morton uses GHS Boomers... are those like the two most popular? Or is there something else?


GHS Boomers blow, IMO, I had them for two cycles-- they broke mere days after I changed them.

Dean Markeley's had a pretty good sound, were quite expensive, and broke after 2 weeks.

Ernie Ball's are my favorite, they last long, sound great, are cheap, and are conveniently color coded so you don't have to dig through a rack looking for a certain set of numbers. I've used them for probably 6 of the 6 and a half years I've been playing.

I play a lot of metal, rock, and jazz on my guitar and tune between standard and standard in C. I just so happen to use the Super Slinky strings for all tunings guages 9- 42. Though, it is generally recommended you use thicker guages when tuning so low as to help create tension so when you bend the note in C standard it doesn't go from the middle of the fretboard all the way off.
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