#1
If Im taking my baby steps in playing the guitar would it be easier on a more expensive guitar? Would I be better off forking out the cash on a more expensive guitar or should I just grab a entry level guitar for learning puposes. I hear the electric guitar is also easier than acoustic. Is this true? Im taking this up because I love music and feel that actually playing it will take me to another level. Maybe Im wrong but Im gonna give it a shot. WHats to lose? I know I'll never be in a band or anything but just looking to jam out in the privacy of my own home someday and play some decent music.

THX for any advice.
#2
brah I went ahead and speant the money for my first (and only) guitar and I wouldn't trade it for the world. I've played other guitars (cheap) and it would have made my learning music really difficult and dull. Get yourself a fairly good guitar, you can always sell it for a cheaper one down the road but come on, its your first, so do her right.
#3
Playing might be easier on a more expensive guitar, but there's no point forking out loads of money when you start when you don't even know how much you'll enjoy guitar in the long term. Don't spend nothing on your first guitar, but entry level is the way to go.
Electric is generally easier, the strings tend to be lighter, and i personally found electric more satisfying (started on acoustic, hard!)
And don't assume u'll never be in a band, you never know how hooked u'll get ...
#4
It's best to go with a Starter Pack. Comes with Guitar, Amp, Cable, Bag and what not.
I did.
11 months playing and I finally have my King V KVX10 because I enjoy playing.
You WILL get stressed out and impatient and take long breaks...
So go with a Start guitar.
Jackson King V KVX10
Line 6 Spider III 75 W.
Peavey 5150/6505 Combo to be owned at the end of 2010.
#5
perhaps if your unsure and just starting out you dont need to spend loads on a really expensive guitar, a lot of the niceties about them youll only really feel and appreciate once youve been playing a while, but equally you dont want to buy a piece of ****, because it could make playing not so nice an experience
you can always sell/buy another one further down the line,
oh and about not thinkinbg youll ever get any good, i started out like that but after a while i really got motivated and now im band-ing and stuff
#6
I disagree about the starter packs, i tend to think you're best of going to a store, looking at what is in your price range, play a couple and go with your heart, if you don't like the guitar you choose, you won't want to play it. That said, its striking a balance between what you like, and spending a fortune...
#7
It won't be easy, but start out on an acoustic or a cheaper electric first. You'll build up more finger strength and dexterity (even moreso with acoustic). Then, when the time comes for a new, more expensive guitar, it'll be be butter-smooth when you play.
Ibanez RGA121 | ESP LTD H-1000
Axe-FX Standard
#8
So as far as starting tools go should I invest in lessons or go for a Learn to... DVD? Im not too worried about getting good fast. Just want to take it one step at a time. What good learning tools are out there? Ive done some searches and there are a million and one DVD's and books. Any particular ones that are top notch?
#9
i wouldnt buy and expensive guitar right away. at least learn the basics then do some research and know what your getting for a better guitar
#10
Just get the most expenisve guitar you find, and the most expensive amp.
It's the only way to go! If you have enough money get three of the same guitar in different colors.

To be honest, I'd buy a decent guitar from a shop try many out find the one I see myself playing with.
#11
One piece of advice i would give you is, by all means, get tutorial books, dvds (theres loads of great tutorials on this site, and youtube) but make sure alongside learning exercises, you learn songs you'll enjoy and want to play, or it can be a very frustrating experience with almost no reward at the start
#12
Human nature dictates that you'll ALWAYS want a new guitar, so it's not vital that you get it right first time. You don't have to spend loads when starting, just spend what you can afford and when it comes to spending a bit more then you'll have a better idea of what you want.
Actually called Mark!

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#15
I say cheap guitar with a set of 11's (Maybe 12's) tuned standard, and here's why.

The 11's are going to hurt like hell but your fingers will both callus up and build strength faster.

I say cheap guitar because cheaper guitars tend to force you to learn about your instrument. Even before stringing it with 11's, chances are the setup will be terrible, and you're not going to be comfortable playing it as is.

The only options are bring it to someone to have it setup, or do some research and man up with a screw driver, and a set of allen keys to make it work
我会关闭我的耳朵,和我的心; 我会变成一个石头
"I will close my ears and my heart and I will be a stone"
#16
Daft idea, 11's are really hard to play - best to start with 9's and learn to play. You can always decide to up the gauge once you've learned the basics. Finger strength is like any other strength, it develops gradually - you start light and build from there, and if you try to make too big a jump you simply can't do it. There's little point making learning the guitar any harder than it already is, and no point in hurting your fingers if it discourages you from playing.
Actually called Mark!

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#18
I checked the Local Pawn shop yesterday and the prices were horrid. They had 2 BC Rich Warlocks that were priced 5 bucks less than the new price on Guitarcenters site. One of them even had a dent and was missing a button. They had a Yamaha Pacifica that priced higher than the internet price. Their Squier Strats were about the same. The guy told me that they ebay the higher end stuff. After that I didnt even bother.
#19
Really, I think, you just need a guitar that plays well (neck should be comfortable thickness), will be balanced sitting and standing, and will allow for easy playing of the higher frets. If you spend like $300-ish on a good brand name you should be fine.
#20
Pawn shop stuff is jacked up anyway, yesterday the guy knocked forty bucks of just because I asked about it. There is plenty of wiggle room on their prices, and if not there is always another one down the street.
#21
yes, you heard right, the electric is much easier than acoustic. Also, with some of the effects used these days like distortion, it can even hide some of your mistakes. Plus, with the lower strings, you don't have to press down on the strings to get the note out.

I would definatly go for a more expensive Guitar, even to learn on. Some people might think this would not be a good idea, but it really is. I started on a really cheap acoustic, and it was so crappy, that it was almost impossible to play. I then got a better acoustic for about $200, and the difference was incredible. It was also much easier to play on than the bad one, and more encouraging. When I played, I sounded like a different person playing. Basically, just remember that a better Guitar=Better playing.
#22
There's no need to spend over $1000 for your first guitar, but I would stay try to spend at least $250 for a competent one. As you improve you'll have a better idea of what you want in a guitar, then you can make an informed purchase.
#24
Quote by steven seagull
Daft idea, 11's are really hard to play - best to start with 9's and learn to play. You can always decide to up the gauge once you've learned the basics. Finger strength is like any other strength, it develops gradually - you start light and build from there, and if you try to make too big a jump you simply can't do it. There's little point making learning the guitar any harder than it already is, and no point in hurting your fingers if it discourages you from playing.


+1

I started with .009s and gradually went up to .011s, I've played with 11s for a while but now I'm back down to 9s and I've been playing with them for the last year or so. I prefer the tone and bendyness of 9s, so I stayed with them. now that I no longer play 11s, they are hard for me to play on, I did grow finger strength when I used 11s, but now most of it's gone now that I play 9s.

The easier it is to play in the beginning, the more you enjoy it. Video games with a really hard boss in the beginning aren't very fun, why should this be any different. Once you get the basics down, then start experimenting with string gauge, effects, different pickups and things of that nature.
#25
You can learn fine on a cheaper guitar, I mean theres no need to drop $2000 on a nice guitar if your just learning, but if you want to by all means go for it. And if your not going to get in a band(which I hope you don't think that just because your learning now, doesn't mean you'll ever get good), then I don't see too much of a point in spending a ton on gear.

I'd suggest getting a MIM stratocaster or an Epiphone Les Paul Standard.
2004 Fender American HSS Strat
Hughes And Kettner Switchblade
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser FR
Epi LP Classic
Epi G-400
Yamaha acoustic
Boss DD-3 Delay
B.Y.O.C. MXR Distortion+
Vox Wah
Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer
#26
I always say every beginner should get either a microcube or a vox vd5, and then whatever guitar they like the look of so they won't get bored of it
#27
Quote by _BucketHead_
I always say every beginner should get either a microcube or a vox vd5, and then whatever guitar they like the look of so they won't get bored of it


I agree on both amps, I gotta get a microcube for the office... As far as guitar, I think a moderate quality guitar to start off with, above entry level but not in the Epi LP Standard price range. MIM strat is a good value. You have to like it to want to play it, you won't like a P.O.S. generally.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#28
Went to a different pawn shop in my area and they didnt have much but did have 3-4 Fender Stratocasters in the range of 250-400. After searching Im thinking these might be looking into. What should I look for specifically when Im checking them out? Should I stay away from any? I know theres alot of threads about Made in ......... and such. Im gonna head back tomorrow and get a closer look at em. I jsut peered over the shelf cause I had to get back to work from my break.
#29
There are lots of things to look for:

1. Action, is it low enough for you and is there buzzing as you play up the neck

2. Intonation - ask for a guitar tuner. Tune the guitar and then play the notes on the 12th fret, if you are still in tune, you have a well intonated guitar

3. Electronics - if you have an electric (or acoustic electric) plug in and move all the knobs. Listen for any crackling or popping

4. Neck - run your fingers up and down the side of the neck near the frets. Better guitars will be smooth and you will not feel the frets. Cheapo guitars will be rough as the frets will extend beyond the fingerboard. this may not be important now, but will be as you get better.

Lastly, you asked earlier about lessons. A good guitar teacher is worth every penny. But the key is getting a good one. Go with a teacher who will teach you want you want to learn while inching you along in the basics. Don't be afraid to learn some styles that may be out of your comfort zone to begin with. Learning blues licks may not be in your genre of thrash metal, for example, but it is a start.

If you want to go with DVD and computer lessons, I recommend True Fire as they have a great variety of genres and styles.

Gregg
#30
Quote by mitchellg23
yes, you heard right, the electric is much easier than acoustic. Also, with some of the effects used these days like distortion, it can even hide some of your mistakes. Plus, with the lower strings, you don't have to press down on the strings to get the note out.

I would definatly go for a more expensive Guitar, even to learn on. Some people might think this would not be a good idea, but it really is. I started on a really cheap acoustic, and it was so crappy, that it was almost impossible to play. I then got a better acoustic for about $200, and the difference was incredible. It was also much easier to play on than the bad one, and more encouraging. When I played, I sounded like a different person playing. Basically, just remember that a better Guitar=Better playing.


Surely you meant better guitar =/= better playing.

If you're crap you're crap, a good guitar won't change that...likewise if you're good you're good no matter what piece of junk someone hands to you.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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#31
Buy an Agile. Inexpensive and nice quality.
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well i can tall you this much do NOT get a marshall MG. becasue you will blow the speaker with duncans in the guitar. i know for experience.


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