#1
Hello, I've been playing bass for 3+ years and I cannot recognize any kind of relative pitches, I find it very hard to even to tune to drop D without the help of a tuner.

I was wondering if anyone has actually used an online ear trainer program to help them recognize intervals and tunings.

Any other suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks.
#5
Thanks guys but I'm already using Good-Ear, I've been using it for about a week now and I'm not seeing any improvement.

The question I asked was do these things actually work or is there a better approach.

My goal is to be able to play whatever I hear in my head without really even having to think about it.
#6
Quote by Scooch
Thanks guys but I'm already using Good-Ear, I've been using it for about a week now and I'm not seeing any improvement.

The question I asked was do these things actually work or is there a better approach.

My goal is to be able to play whatever I hear in my head without really even having to think about it.


First comment, it takes more than a week. It can take months, sometimes years.

Second comment on the playing what ever I hear in my head. The most accurate instrument you own is your own voice. Seriously. Take that which is in your head, sing it and then play it. It will go much easier and over time you will build a good musical ear.
#7
well just know roughly where it is, if it makes it easier hum the note out loud and pluck the string until you can find the right note
then go from there, I worked out Vampire Weekend - A-Punk like this
I'm a Fire, and I'll Burn.Burn.Burn.
#8
Quote by anarkee
First comment, it takes more than a week. It can take months, sometimes years.

Second comment on the playing what ever I hear in my head. The most accurate instrument you own is your own voice. Seriously. Take that which is in your head, sing it and then play it. It will go much easier and over time you will build a good musical ear.

You obviously haven't heard me singing!
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#9
Quote by Welsh Guitar
You obviously haven't heard me singing!


There's a different between accurate and pleasant. I have an OK singing voice (I can do backup singing) but I am not someone who you want to hear singing lead. However I have above average relative pitch esp. with my voice.

Yes--you might not sound pleasant, but you're probably closer to being in "pitch" than you know.
#10
With voice it is much easier than with an instrument. Think about it: your instrument is finite. It has a B and then a C. Your voice has every single Hz in between that as well. Tone doesn't matter, but the pitch should come relatively easily with a bit of work.

But anarkee is right, practise, practise, practise. How long are you doing Good-Ear for? 10 times, 30 times, 50 times, 100 times? You should aim to do about 100 different pitch relatives each session. I did it for about a month (sadly I've gotten away from it) and after starting at about a 65% average I was hitting close the an 85% every time. There is an improvement there you just have to do it lots to find it. Another tip is use your voice, like anarkee said. When you hear the two pitches sing them and compare them to an arpeggio and see where they fall. Try not to have your instrument with you when you're doing it either.
#11
The other good thing is that you will start hearing intervals in music as well. Root to Fifth? Opening two notes of the "Star Wars Theme"....lol. Its quite amazing how much you will begin to "hear" in the music you listen to and play.
#12
Ok thanks, using unison, major 3rd, perf 5th, and octave right now. I usually go 100 times and get between 60-80.

I have real trouble with notes that are sound lower than the original.
#14
I got like, 30% or something,

Also, i've been doing it by kind of making the two notes into a little tune, like a walking bass line or something and working it out from there, is that cheating?
Last edited by jimRH7 at Feb 29, 2008,