#1
So I had my first lesson today with a teacher who has a Bachelor of Music Degree in Jazz Studies from Northwestern University School of Music and was basically teaching me technique today ... the basics.

Anyway one thing he did which I haven't seen too much anywhere really was the way he wanted me to position the guitar when holding it was high up, having the head of the guitar be at eye level, so basically like you would hold a classical guitar, is this a good way to be taught the entire time?

I'm just wondering if thats how hes going to have me holding it at every lesson and such, since he seemed pretty strict about it being the proper way to hold and play it when beginning, and said it would make the playing/learning faster.
#3
Once you're used to it it's much more comfortable than the way most people play nowadays. I've heard people say learn whatever you're learning in the classical position then play it sitting however you want to later. I Personaly slump right over the guitar when playing. This reminds me of when I had a guitar teacher and realized he was a waste of time, they'll teach you how to play the way they like to, not the way that's necesarily right for you...that isn't to say having a teacher is wrong either though...
#4
Quote by david_highland
Once you're used to it it's much more comfortable than the way most people play nowadays. I've heard people say learn whatever you're learning in the classical position then play it sitting however you want to later. I Personaly slump right over the guitar when playing. This reminds me of when I had a guitar teacher and realized he was a waste of time, they'll teach you how to play the way they like to, not the way that's necesarily right for you...that isn't to say having a teacher is wrong either though...


yeah, I took lessons though just because I want to also learn theory and such, and he has been able to help me with my fretting and picking technique already anyway so I don't mind him, and holding it like that makes it somewhat easier but that just what I've done so far today.
#5
My teacher makes me play like that too...
I think it's easier to play accurately when standing up if u play like that sitting down, as the guitar is at the same angle to your body...

This said, it's all about how low u like ur guitar to be when standing up... If u play like the beatles, then i guess it's easier if u slump over the guitar...
(\__/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Put him in your signature and help
(")_(") him on his way to world domination.


My "Pwnage" Gear

Tony Iommi SG
Squier Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Fender G-DEC
Boss Overdrive/Distortion OS-2
#7
Think about what happens when you take a driving lesson. Your instructor is going to make you hold the wheel properly at 10 and 2 and everything will be done "by the book." In reality, most people drive with 1 hand and make left turns into the right land and all kinds of stuff that is technically wrong, but safe and acceptable, though drivers do a lot of stupid things as well, myself included.

The analogy is that you should hold your guitar the proper way as you learn. However, as you get better, you will adjust your posture and do what's comfortable. Your teacher will likely become less strict about it as you progress, but I agree that asking him can't hurt.
#8
Holding the guitar up high makes it so much easier...you can see what you're doing and easily reach all parts of the neck. I wear my Gretsch up high because it's an awkward shape to me...hey if it's good enough for Tom Morello...
#9
My lesson's started off the same way. It was awkard but as a beginner I got used to it fast and it allowed me to see the lower strings.
#10
I take classical guitar lessons, and I also hold the guitar in that format (as any other classical guitar player would).

When playing electric guitar you will obviously play differnet (especially when standing up), but the general techniques still apply.

It gets more comfortable and natural after practising with it a bit. I'd listen to your teacher, he seems to know what he's talking about.