#1
I'm not sure if this is the right forum for this, but I'll ask anyway.

When I first went to college 2 years ago, I thought I knew what I wanted to do. It seemed an easy choice to get into the computer networking field, as that's what I saw myself doing back then. Fast forward more than 2 years. I'm almost 21 now and my mind is completely changed. I graduated last May with an associate degree in networking, and many opportunities ahead of me. However, I haven't gotten a job yet since I decided to dedicate my life to playing the bass and studying music after the Rush concert I saw last year changed my view on things (yeah, pretty corny, I know...).

However, I started to realize lately that I need a decent job soon. I started writing up my resume today, and I found that it was almost torture. I really don't want to be doing this. I know, I could be making some good money in the networking field. But I don't want to go through life thinking to myself "what if?" This type of job just doesn't feel like me anymore.

I want a career in music now, but it doesn't feel like one of those phases where I'll just get over it and move on in a year. I really want to do this. There are several problems, though. First off, if I do end up going back to college for music, my first 2 years will have been a complete waste. Also, a slightly bigger problem is that I have no clue what type of jobs I could be getting (I'm not cut out to be a teacher, which is the first job that came to mind). Could I make a living/support a family out of a job that requires a music degree? I don't want to struggle through life... making less money than I would in networking is perfectly fine with me, but I want to be somewhat comfortable. One last thing.... like I mentioned, I just started studying music last summer. Are my chances of getting into college (not necessarily a music college) pretty much shot if I don't know a whole lot yet?

Thanks for reading, I know it's long, but I feel like I needed to ask someone.
Last edited by flapz at Feb 28, 2008,
#4
I am in a similar situation. What I suggest you do is make use of the degree you have worked to achieve by getting a decent paying job AND go back to school for music. Now, I understand that having a full-time job may slow school down a bit for you/it will take you longer to complete, but I don't understand why you wouldn't want a decent paying job while pursuing what you really want to do in the long run. I doesn't make sense. Anyway, good luck, I hope what I've said has helped somewhat.
#5
It's comforting to know that I'm not the only one that's having this problem. I was planning on getting a job with the degree I have, even if it's not what I want to be doing since I can't go back to college until at least fall anyway. Who knows, maybe I'll end up liking it more than I think.
#6
Also I just noticed that I spelled 'pursue' wrong in the title... ****
#7
At this point I would let yourself settle down and work for a year or two while still playing and loving music in your spare time to get better. Study up and then apply for a college, or maybe even night school or something if you want to keep your job going.

It might take longer than going right now, but you will be able to pay off any debts you have and still enjoy yourself.

Also, you'll gain experience in the workforce which may give you more opportunities for the future just in case music doesn't work out for you.
#8
I'm facing a similar dilehma too: the A-levels that I'm doing that I would want to progress onto a degree with are Music and Philosophy, neither of which are exactly guarantees for a solid career. However, you can do more than you might think with a music degree. Apart from teaching music in some form (and teachers are always in short supply), there are loads of jobs that will take you on if you have a degree, no matter what subject it's in.

But if you want to have a career in music, most people will either become a session musician, part of an orchestra or compose/perform with teaching as their bread-earner.
#9
There are precious few jobs where you can call yourself a professional musician and have what most people conventionally describe as a comfortable income. Teaching is one, but if that's not your thing, then you MUST NOT DO IT. Being a teacher myself, I can tell you that if you are in it for the money and not because you feel "called" to do it, then will will HATE it. Me, I love it, but I don't teach music very often. I'd rather be in the classroom.

There's always the career option of becoming a rock star. I remember reading an interview with Art Alexakis from Everclear and he was talking about how he had an electrician over to do some work. They got to chatting and the electrician asked him what it was like to be a "semi-famous" rock star and what-not. Ultimately, during the conversation, it turned out that the electrician made more money than the semi-famous rock star. I know two other semi-famous rock stars and only one of them lives that conventional "comfortable" lifestyle. Mind you, he teaches a lot of students, runs the band almost entirely by himself, and does other singing engagements. It's not like he's living luxuriously off his past. He works damned hard.

Most professional musicians have to work a lot of really crappy hours and a zillion and one various little jobs that eventually add up to something resembling an income. Crappy hours (mostly nights and weekends), lots of covers, probably some private teaching, the odd recording gig.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
I figured I would get a degree in music business and recording engineering, then persue a rock star status.
#12
It's a shame that it would be so hard for me to find something to do with a music degree... can anyone recommend getting a minor in music though, just to get some valuable experience?
#14
Im kinda similar to this situation. Im only a junior in hs, but the thing is, i want to be a pro musician and i want to go to GIT but Im like a genius who according to psat results should at least get a 2100 on the sat so my parents want me to do something smart like be a doctor, but i just want to rock.
Member #8 of the "I Love Mexican Food" club. PM frozen-dirt to join
#15
Quote by ouchies
Well.. how good are you at music? how much experience do you have? how talented are you (honestly?) there is a lot of competition in the music field..



I only have about 6 months experience, and honestly I'm not extremely talented. I'm probably average. I did pick up on rhythm faster than anything else, though. That's probably the only area I'm above average in.
#16
Quote by bsoates
Im kinda similar to this situation. Im only a junior in hs, but the thing is, i want to be a pro musician and i want to go to GIT but Im like a genius who according to psat results should at least get a 2100 on the sat so my parents want me to do something smart like be a doctor, but i just want to rock.


a guy in my high school, smartest guy I ever met, or really have ever heard of, got invited to Harvard full scholarship. He's a carnie right now. So you do what you want.
#17
It's not how good you are, it's how badly you want to do it. There are lots of fabulously talented musicians out there that are not employed as professional musicians. Obviously, you have to be competent, but the following will help you to make it:
-social skills - if you can't get along with people, you're done.
-willing to take a chance at living around or even below the poverty line in order to pursue what you really love to do
-willing to work the crappiest hours imaginable
-willing to play songs you hate and smile all the way through it like you're having the time of your life in the name of paying the hydro bill or signing your kid up for swimming lessons
-willing to have a schedule that is never predictable and often inconvenient - often requiring you to jump at an opportunity (gig, session,etc.) with only a moment's notice
-willing and able to play a variety of musical styles - greater versatility = greater employability
-being able to read charts, notation - not just tabs
-being able to provide something the next person can't - maybe backing vocals, keys, whatever, in addition to being a guitarist

You get the idea.

I was in a similar position as some of the above posts. Up until grade 12, I was still contemplating engineering, accounting (going for an MBA), or music. When I auditioned for, and got accepted to the music program, my great aunt was happy for me, but was a little disappointed that I didn't go into engineering. On the other hand, she was okay with it because I had teaching in mind. At least it's "respectable" - not like being a rock star or a DJ or something.

By contrast, one guy who was a friend of mine in my music program was a computer engineer at a large steel company making great money. He hated it, and went back to school for music. He's now a professor (at University of Tampa, I believe).

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#18
You shouldn't do what you love for a living. You will be attached to your work and it will run your life. It is better to resent your work life and be thankful for your friends, family, and life away from work.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#20
Quote by Muphin
You shouldn't do what you love for a living. You will be attached to your work and it will run your life. It is better to resent your work life and be thankful for your friends, family, and life away from work.


If you love it, why would being attached to it ruin your life? Wouldn't it enhance it?

.... from someone who enjoys his work....

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#21
Ok, I'm really glad I made this post. This doesn't seem like such a good idea anymore. I'm still going to do all that I can to study music though... I'm lucky enough to have several musician friends that share similar tastes in music to actually play with. Thing is, we all live pretty far apart at the moment. We're planning on forming a band some day after we're all settled, and if we can at least get gigs, not matter how small, I'll be happy.