#1
Alright! (Sorry about how long it took me to do anything)

Obviously some of you have seen my post about the Bass Militia. And, wonderfully, lots of people have joined up. Which got some of us older members thinking.

What could we give back to the bass forum, when it's given us so much? Well, 83lespaulstudio had the marvellous idea for an Ask The Bass Militia thread.

Note: This is not the Bass Forum FAQ. If any questions are asked here that are already answered in the FAQ, you will be redirected to that and you can be guaranteed that no one will answer that particular question in this thread.

Carrying on, I expect you're wondering what questions you can ask here?

Well, anything that isn't covered by the FAQ.

Let me extrapolate upon that. The kind of questions that will be answered in this thread are those that require a sense of experience from the longer time users of this board.

For example: Problems with your band, auditioning, composition and other similar problems.

Think of this thread as an official "Bass Forum Agony Aunts Section", as Anarkee kindly put it.

Anyway, please read this before posting. Thanks, and keep this thread to the point!

Also, Don't ask in this thread to join the Bass Militia. PM me.
In the bass chat:

<Jon> take the quote of me out your sig plx
<Jon> i hate seeing what i said around lol


Leader of the Bass Militia PM to join!



And now on BANDCAMP!


Officially the funniest member of the Bass Forum.
Last edited by Nutter_101 at Feb 28, 2008,
#2
*EDITED SO I DONT LOOK LIKE A FOOL*

actually i think i'll save it for when i have decent bass gear, and wont be mocked inceasantly
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
Last edited by stevo_epi_SG_wo at Feb 28, 2008,
#5
Maybe you should put in big writing....


"do not ask to join here, PM me"

Gear:
Fender Standard Jazz Bass
Artec Matrix Pedal Tuner
BBE Optostomp
Boss GEB 7
EHX NYC Big Muff
Ashdown MAG C410T-300
Torque T100BX
GAS-ing for:
Boss SYB5
Behringer Intelligate IG9
#6
Maybe something like "Chat *****s - don't spam up this thread" would help too

Edit: I meant "Wenches of Chat, thou spamme this thread at ye peril!"

Double edit: I do actually have a question. Does anyone use a decent bass wah that isn't mega-expensive? I've tried the Morley Duel but it's got too many things I don't like about it to buy it. How's the Crybaby?
Last edited by smb at Feb 28, 2008,
#7
Here's a question from within the ranks:

So, basically, I have to choose courses tomorrow which puts me in an interesting dilemma: whether to take classical major (a little history/theory at the beginning and the rest playing) or jazz major (extensive history and simple theory for the first half; playing for the last half). Normally I would instantly go for jazz, but lately I've been finding saxophone=t3h major suck and it'll be a pretty slight chance to try out for the jazz and make it in as the teachers are obsessed with the current bass player. In Classical Major I would be playing bass almost 100% unless a really smokin' grade 9 comes in and takes my spot.

In the end I guess it comes down to this: playing bass or playing jazz. Jazz is what I want to do later in life, but so is bass :S

What do you all think?
#8
I'm not experienced much with bass wahs, but *flame sheild?* I believe that wahs are a very guitar-like effect, and sound best when used in that very vocal, throaty way. I own the Bass 105Q, and I find it good, but very envelope filter ooo-aap sounding instead of wwww-ahhh sounding. Swishy and watery is the word I use for it. Solid, but keep that in mind. It has Q control (to reduce the quack, but it's always there) and volume control, as well as a low pass filter so you never trully fall out of the mix.

I can give you links to the pedal being played in a band situation if you wish.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#10
Ok, here's a question, and it may sound stupid, but it is genuine, it is also not an lame-ass way to promote my band,ok? good!

longish story, I owned a Boss ODB-3 for a good 18 months, then recently traded it and my bass balls (I got sick of sounding like a farting duck ) in,and got store credit/ chromatic tuner pedal (my band has some tunes in drop D, some in C and others in standard, it helps to have an accurate and noisless way to tune up/down on stage), however, i really missed my ODB-3, luckily, my girl friend (bless her) overheard me going on about how I miss it, and, her dad being into music, made sure he got me a replacement for my 18th bday (28th feb,so just yesterday over here in UK), and I'm totally into it again, playing some Burtonesque stuff, and just messing, coming up with a cool riff randomly

Anyway, my question to you, experienced and talented folks all (check this buttering up, freakin top notch ) is how dyu guys think I can utilise this effect in this band:

www.myspace.com/feveredegosmusic

I know u shud only have effects if u know u'll use them, and I learnt my lesson with the bass balls, though still want a envelope filter/ cry baby bass wah, especially after that vid smb just linked, and I do have some ideas, but, Im just after...musical direction shall we say?

again, this is not a lame band plug, but a genuine request for help, im not a sad little kid

Im a drunkish big kid
Quote by the humanity
I'm just joking Moog. you know nothing can tear our friendship apart, not even the fact we are miles apart, I am right there beside you, yelling, "Chug it, ya little wimp!"
#11
I have nothing useful to say but...

your singer is brilliant! I've had a quick listen to a couple of those songs and love them...he sounds like John Garcia
#12
Quote by smb
I have nothing useful to say but...

your singer is brilliant! I've had a quick listen to a couple of those songs and love them...he sounds like John Garcia


that addressed to me?

I'll tell him

Im sure he'll appreciate

my mate says there's a certain Black Francis quality to him

on Road to El dorado contains no LLamas part 1 LIVE

lol
Quote by the humanity
I'm just joking Moog. you know nothing can tear our friendship apart, not even the fact we are miles apart, I am right there beside you, yelling, "Chug it, ya little wimp!"
#13
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Here's a question from within the ranks:

So, basically, I have to choose courses tomorrow which puts me in an interesting dilemma: whether to take classical major (a little history/theory at the beginning and the rest playing) or jazz major (extensive history and simple theory for the first half; playing for the last half). Normally I would instantly go for jazz, but lately I've been finding saxophone=t3h major suck and it'll be a pretty slight chance to try out for the jazz and make it in as the teachers are obsessed with the current bass player. In Classical Major I would be playing bass almost 100% unless a really smokin' grade 9 comes in and takes my spot.

In the end I guess it comes down to this: playing bass or playing jazz. Jazz is what I want to do later in life, but so is bass :S

What do you all think?

i'm thinking if you intend on making music an occupation, later in life, Classical seems to have more options. wheather it's teaching, or performing. then you could use the stable money to fund your Jazzy dreams. but really i would choose the instrument that i was more skilled, or talented at. and we will get to say, we knew you before you were famous!
#14
Jazzy:

This is my (proudly) uneducated opinion, but I always thought Classical to be a teachable music, where Jazz is very much an improvisational music. When you're playing classical, you rarely, if ever, stray from a said piece, whereas in Jazz, a cover can consist of just a chord progression in common. To me, it's hard to teach improvisation - you either got it, or you don't, coming from a pseudo-former improv comic. I'd compare classical music to theatre and jazz to improv comedy, and I find there not much to teach about improv comedy.

I don't know if that made any sense, but schooling to me applies to classical on the button, whereas jazz seems like "uh, here are the ideas - now you take a shot at it" and schooling doesn't necessarily mean you'll be a good jazz player. Classical kinda assures it, assuming you pass it.

Make any sense?

EDIT: With Jazz, you could have covered all the material but still have no improv chops. With Classical, covering all the material ensures you know it, making the education a better "value". Does that clear it up?
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
Last edited by thefitz at Feb 28, 2008,
#15
Wow, Rick, I never even thought of that, but it's so true. The opportunities of classical are so much more than jazz. That's a good point.

Fitzy, I see where you're coming from but I can also say that jazz is teachable in some ways. There's two jazzes: learning jazz (almost synonymous with big band jazz) and gigging jazz. Learning jazz is very teachable. It's basically learning to sight read and solo through transcription and practise. Gigging jazz is very much how you described it: unteachable. It's all about getting out there and gigging. But what I would be taking would be "learning jazz" which, you're right, doesn't necessarily mean I'll be a great player, but it will improve it. I can't come out worse. In the end, chords are chords and you need chords to play a jazz solo and I'll learn chords in jazz studies so in the end I will be a better player. That's the kind of take I'm looking at this with.
#16
Yeah, but even then, you mentioned being able to solo over chords in learning jazz. That's still quite improvisational, and I think learning classical will actually teach you more about solos than "here's a chord, do something." Yeah, those solos are written out, but I think you can pick up more licks learning pre-written stuff than futzing about over chords. Unless you have pre-written solos in learned jazz.

And IMO Jazz and Classical players die-hards are the most elitist people you'll meet. With Jazz, you'll need your chops (and an acoustic instrument) which, like I said, that education may not provide. In classical, you'll need to be learned, and that's EXACTLY what education will provide.

Also, I think it may boil down to how outgoing you are as a player. Will it bug you to never be heard and play the same parts that have been played for centuries? Or will it bug you to never be heard and and potentially be the centre of attention when the piano player does band intros?
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#17
The great thing about this ensemble that I may be signing up for is it's one person per part, consisting of maybe 30 people. So the beauty part is I will actually be heard. But I in general, yeah I get where you're coming from.

About the improv thing though, improv is taught through doing. You have to do it a lot to be able to do it well. Whether you do it in a class or out in the real world is quite irrelevant. It's actually not, you have it or you don't. It can be worked at because, after all, a large part of improvisation is the theory. Learning the chords, learning the inversions, voice-leading, and then you're just all of a sudden improvising.

Anyway, thanks for the input. I think I'm probably going to go in for the Classical Major at this point, unless someone comes up with a real humdinger of a reason why I shouldn't
#18
Yeah, I get ya. You do get a feel for improvising with experience. However, as with improv comedy, it teaches you when to say your line, how to say your line, where to say your line - but how good that line is depends on your personality. After doing it for a long time, you could get to the point where every line is funny, but some cats can get people in stitches every single time.

How I miss those days...
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#20
Jazzy:

Back when dinosaurs were roaming the earth and high school conductors were emerging from the Jurassic slime, I had the same decision you are facing in HS. I choose the "classical" orchestra over the jazz band. For me it was the choice of playing 1st chair 2nd clarinet and/ or 1st chair oboe, over a crap shoot I would be beat out by 10 other sax players in Jazz band.

Classical is a solid education that will build skills that can be carried into all other types of music, and lead all sorts of places if you make music a vocation or an advocation. My current teacher is stunned that I can read music like a demon and can grasp advanced concepts fairly well. And in college, I did make it into the Jazz band, though I will admit only now I am really understanding Jazz. You have a leg up on me in that respect, so I think that if you take the classical route, its not going to be a bad thing and you'll be playing bass. Plus there are always opportunities, esp. at college for outside jams and combos for stretching those jazz wings.

Good luck, and let us know how it all plays out. We're there for you .
#21
Dear Bass Militia:

Sorry for the double post. Here is my dilemma.

A co-worker and a fairly good friend is an amazing blue guitarist, who hasn't been able to lock into a band situation that allows him to use his skills (he's playing in jazz and a rock band right now). I have seen him play and when I say he's good, he's amazingly good. He's also not arrogant and and all round wonderful person. I value his friendship and his sense of humor and respect his skills immensely.

So what is the problem you say? Well....he's asked me to jam with him. While I have decent blues chops I just feel like I am getting in over my head and I am sure he thinks I am better than I really am (that is his level). He has seen me play once btw. My concern is that he is going to have to play down to my level (causing frustration) and I am going to be frustrated not being able to play up to his level.

So do I decline saying I need to woodshed more? Or should I take the leap of faith and throw caution to the wind?
#22
It's funny - I had that pretty much happen. It was me, my guitar player, his dad, kid brother, and sister's boyfriend at my guitar player's family cottage. For some reason, that weekend, the guitar player and I didn't really jam (no drummer, after all). However, my guitar player's sister's boyfriend (how's that one for ya?) pretty much fell into the same description, except I was even worse. We just jammed, for hours. Total ****e. My playing root notes, crap like that. Blues in E for hours.

However, there are plenty of ways to mix it up without being good. You can play root notes, but I love the root, root, octave, octave, minor 7th, minor 7th, 5th, 5th bass line. There's a million ways to play it. That wonderful root-octave-min7-5 pattern. It never gets old. Or, if you want, do some minor walking, or chromatically upwards starting from the root note... E F F# G E F F# G etc. Millions of little, easy, simple things to do that'll keep it going.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#23
I think part of the problem is that I am an above average blues bass player, but he's just a really great natural blues player. Maybe, part of it is that I am in a bit of shall we say it, awe? I also don't want to also put a strain on a really good friendship as well.

Crap Fitz, I'm playing head games with myself. I love playing blues and I should at least give a go. And maybe I should just go with the flow and forget about being impressive.
#24
Yeah - don't overanalyze! Unless... no!

I kinda wanna say "it's just the blues, man!" If you feel out of your league, let dude solo. It's not like your both playing the same string skipping arpeggio or need to play anything totally in synch. Hell, if you're really rattled, sloppy blues is sometimes the best! Go out there are have fun!
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#25
What's the worst that can happen? The guy shoots himself in the head because of how bad you are? Maybe. But how bad would that really be? Seriously though, you can only become a better player through it. I mean, take my keyboardist for example, he's got AMAZING classical chops, but his jazz and weirder stuff that we do is kind of weak. But even in the three or four weeks we've been jamming he's already coming up to level. The same'll happen to you when you're forced in an uncomfortable position.
#26
Quote by anarkee

Crap Fitz, I'm playing head games with myself. I love playing blues and I should at least give a go. And maybe I should just go with the flow and forget about being impressive.

Tams, my dear, you have answered your own question.
i agree with Fitz and Bales. just go for it. you'll have fun, he'll have fun, and both of you will learn something. first jams are almost always akward, but you have to get through it to find a good jammin' buddy. besides, a good friendship will survive any
obstacle. except sex. (jefferson airplane, fleetwood mack) lol
#27
Well I talked to him yesterday. We're going to have a jam at my house in the near future(so, we can avoid having to lug my spouses drum kit in the car) and then have a pot luck dinner as well. So thanks guys!
#28
Dang, I didn't get to through in my two cents...

Well I'll do it anyway! I would say go for it. I was recently asked to play at a blue...grass concert. I didn't know the style very well, and the choir teacher didn't have music. (And I suck at ear playing) so the first time we practice I don't catch on, and it sounds horrible. So I'm thinking about going in and telling him to use the other bassist, (Because he is an amzing ear player) and I decide to stick out this session and see how it goes.

Well, he had a recording this time, so me and the guitarest played along with it, and I started to get it down! I was estatic! And by the time the teacher rounded up the choir and brought them back in I was set! It's one of the greatest feelings to know you nailed a song with only having played it a couple times. So I think you made the right choice Tam!
#29
F-man, bluegrass is fun, and can be challenging. i say, way to go!!
the only bad music is "no" music. i've always wanted to try Zydeco. those Louisiana boys play some funky-ass beats.