#1
how do i keep the G string from ringing? it occasionally happens while playing, and can make a good solo sound bad. It's hard to damp it out with my palm when playing a note on the B string, because it then damps out the B string too. How can i keep this from happening?
Gear:
Ibanez RGA121 Prestige
Roland Cube 30X
Line 6 Pod XT Live
Ibanez AEL20E Acoustic-Electric
#2
Left hand muting is your friend.
Just rest an extra finger on the string.
Epiphone Les Paul goldtop (EMG 81/85)
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Fender Telecaster MIM
Epiphone SG Special
Jay Turser JT200 Serpent (GFS Crunchy Rails/Crunchy Pat)
Dean V-Coustic
Ovation Celebrity
Bugera 333-212
Crate Blue Voodoo 120H
#4
you just get used to damping it with the tip of your pointer finger
#5
Quote by truespin
Left hand muting is your friend.
Just rest an extra finger on the string.


but how am i supposed to do that when i'm fretting up the board with more than one finger? i can't keep one stable while i move the other 3 and it frets the string i'm supposed to be keeping silent...
Gear:
Ibanez RGA121 Prestige
Roland Cube 30X
Line 6 Pod XT Live
Ibanez AEL20E Acoustic-Electric
#6
practice practice time is your friend
Gear
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
Ibanez EX 470 (1991)

Peavey 6505 combo
Vox Valvetronix AD15VT
Danville 1X12 Cab
Kustom 12w tube

Dunlop Crybaby
DOD overdrive(YJM)
Boss Ns-2
PodXt
Dod 250 Overdrive
#7
You have to do a combination of muting with both hands. If you're soloing on the higher strings you can be muting the other strings with your picking hand. When you've been playing a while you can adjust your muting without thinking about it, though I still often have to think about muting on certain things and then you just have to work out a way to do it.
#8
practice on your clean channel. It will force you to play cleanly, becuase there is no distortion to hide little mistakes.
#9
Quote by SomeDude49
but how am i supposed to do that when i'm fretting up the board with more than one finger? i can't keep one stable while i move the other 3 and it frets the string i'm supposed to be keeping silent...

The other option is to get more pick control. Try using a heavier pick and more precise strokes... Heavier picks flop less.
Epiphone Les Paul goldtop (EMG 81/85)
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Fender Telecaster MIM
Epiphone SG Special
Jay Turser JT200 Serpent (GFS Crunchy Rails/Crunchy Pat)
Dean V-Coustic
Ovation Celebrity
Bugera 333-212
Crate Blue Voodoo 120H
#10
Quote by ESPjohn666
practice on your clean channel. It will force you to play cleanly, becuase there is no distortion to hide little mistakes.

Actually, I find that distorion will bring out the mistakes much more clearly.
If a string is vibrating, but very softly, you won't really hear it in the clean channel. When everything is distorted, these buzzing open strings become a nightmare and are much easier to spot, at least for me.
Gear:
-Ibanez S470 DXQM (Blue)
-Roland Cube 30X
#11
^ thank you!

I remember going from my little practice amp to my half stack (back in the stone ages) and having to really learn how to control all of the noise that thing put out from my guitar.

Keep the edge of your picking hand against the strings above the ones you're playing at the moment. It becomes second nature after a while.
#12
You can do what master JP does, put some clothes on the top (or midle) of fretboard, tie it around it (not too tight thought) Enjoy it !
#13
get a mesa boogie amp
Quote by rancidryan
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#15
haha, i never understood why people say to play on the clean channel. Distortion may cover up sloppy picking, but when your playing and open strings start to vibrate it really brings out the noise alot more.
#16
The best reason to play with the clean channel is it will help you to articulate your notes because it takes more of an effort to get them to sound. The compression and sustain caused by distortion make it's easier to play quickly and it brings out notes that might otherwise be not played very well. For example playing legato is much harder to do well with a clean tone or on an acoustic.
#17
Quote by Jayez
haha, i never understood why people say to play on the clean channel. Distortion may cover up sloppy picking, but when your playing and open strings start to vibrate it really brings out the noise alot more.

Sure, you hear the noise, but you don't really hear it as 'wrong'. Gain hides mistakes.
#18
Quote by mr_hankey
Sure, you hear the noise, but you don't really hear it as 'wrong'. Gain hides mistakes.

Not necessarily, distortion forces you to clean up playing, it amplifies all the tiny little harmonics when you lift your finger off the string and when you let open strings ring out and when you hit a wrong note, the harshness is only amplified.
#19
if your playing with high gain and want a clean sound you gotta pick the strings very very gently, if you practice it youll be able to play full speed gently and not cause the strings to sound overdrive... just give it time dude
2008 M.I.A. HSS Strat
Marshall JCM 900 50w Dual Reverb
#20
Perfect technique is always good. Precise pick control and proper fretting are definitely worth learning if you want to play cleanly with any amount of gain.

Personally though, I like a little messiness when playing. It reminds people you're a person and not a machine. You don't want to play out of tune, but learn to use those high-gain "mistakes" to inject a little funk in your lick.
what happened to the proposed Kirk Hammett flamenco album?


His acoustic didn't sound good with wah pedal, I suppose.
#21
Quote by Doubleday
Perfect technique is always good. Precise pick control and proper fretting are definitely worth learning if you want to play cleanly with any amount of gain.

Personally though, I like a little messiness when playing. It reminds people you're a person and not a machine. You don't want to play out of tune, but learn to use those high-gain "mistakes" to inject a little funk in your lick.


That shouldn't stop you from trying to perfect your technique. Making the odd mistake is ok, if not good, every now and again, but for shredding (Which I'm guessing what you're trying to do), all the best players have impeccable accuracy and they work hard to get there. They don't work hard so that they can be sloppy later. General sloppiness is just unacceptable, you don't want to end up like Herman Li do you?
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#22
Quote by Shred Head
Not necessarily, distortion forces you to clean up playing, it amplifies all the tiny little harmonics when you lift your finger off the string and when you let open strings ring out and when you hit a wrong note, the harshness is only amplified.


So you're saying mistakes are heard less when played clean? No way.