#1
hey guys. just to be sure, the dorian mode is the most basic (basiccest?) mode right?
for example: C D E F G A B C would be C major dorian right?
and D E F G A B D# D would be D minor dorian right?
Am I getting it confused with another mode?
Don't bother writing a whole long thesis on modes because chances are I'll just zone out and start drooling.
THANKS!
#2
No, C D E F G A B C would be C Ionian. C Dorian would be C D Eb F G A Bb C. D Dorian would be D E F G A B C D. I'm not sure where you got that D# from.

Major Dorian does not exist. Minor Dorian is redundant; please just say Dorian.

It appears that you need a long thesis on modes. I'll suggest some lessons if you would like.
#3
the d# came from making d minor scale.
i was just wondering which mode had all whole steps except a 1/2 step between 3 &4 and between 7&8. I don't know why I put a minor scale in there because that makes absolutely no sense but whatever, you get the idea.
#5
You are thinking about it wrong I think, I used to think of modes and always referr back to the cmajor scale to figure them out. But if you think of it like this I find it easier.

Like all scales the Letter like in A major, states what note the scale starts on, or what the root is, then the word following it, major, minor, harmonic minor, dorian, lydian, whatever tells us what pattern to follow afte the initial root note. So A Minor would tell us to play an A minor and then follow a minor scale pattern after that, W H W W H W W. So for C Dorian you would play the C note and follow it by the dorian scale pattern. Since dorian is the Second scale degree you would figure out what scale has C AS THE SECOND NOTE then follow that MAJOR scale from the second note to the 9th.


Theres your speal, hope your note drooling, and if you are you should get that checked out.
#7
Sorry Ashbory4 but I don't think that is quite correct.
Since Dorian is the Second scale degree you would refer back to your C major scale
C D E F G A B C. All the Dorian mode means is that you start from the 2nd degree of C
D E F G A B C D which is the D Dorian scale. And so on and so on.
The minor scale is nothing other than the Aeolian mode, which would be the C major scale starting from the 6th degree
A B C D E F G A which is the A Aeolian (minor) scale, also known as C majors relative minor.
#9
Quote by Seryaph
Sorry Ashbory4 but I don't think that is quite correct.
Since Dorian is the Second scale degree you would refer back to your C major scale
C D E F G A B C. All the Dorian mode means is that you start from the 2nd degree of C
D E F G A B C D which is the D Dorian scale. And so on and so on.
The minor scale is nothing other than the Aeolian mode, which would be the C major scale starting from the 6th degree
A B C D E F G A which is the A Aeolian (minor) scale, also known as C majors relative minor.



I said C dorian not D Dorian did you catch that?

I'm saying instead of always referring to the cmajor scale to figure it out you can look at mode as just different scales (which they are) and play them that way instead of seeing something like F phrygian and having to play the C major scale through different degrees just to figure out what phrygian is in the key of F
#10
Standard Modes Article:

Deffy:
First of all, a mode is a way of playing a scale. There are 7 basic modes, all based on the major scale. If you don't know the major scale, learn it ASAP. The intervals are W W H W W W H.

Anyways, since there are 7 notes in the major scale, you can have 7 different root notes (or starting points) and still be in the same key. For the purpose of this lesson I'll be using the key of C, because it has no flats and no sharps, and is one of the most common keys.

First of all, start thinking of notes as scale degrees:

  Note: C D E F G A B C
Degree: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1


The names of the modes, in order, are Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Locrian, and they start on their respective scale degrees.

Starting on the first degree, you get 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1, which is Ionian. Also the major scale.

Starting on the second degree, your notes are D E F G A B C D. This is the Dorian mode. Its formula is 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1. Here's why:


 Degrees: 1 2 3  4 5 6 7  1
 D scale: D E F# G A B C# D

D Dorian: D E F  G A B C  D
 Degrees: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1


You should be able to see how the F# was flatted down to F natural and C# down to C natural. That is how each mode's formula is found.

The third mode is Phrygian, its forumula is 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1. In the key of C, the notes would be E F G A B C D E = E Phrygian.

The fourth is Lydian. Formula is 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 1.

5th is Mixolydian, 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 1.

6th is Aeolian, or the natural minor scale. 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1.

7th is Locrian, which is a half diminished scale. 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 1.

Therefore, the 7 modes in the key of C are:
C Ionian
D Dorian
E Phrygian
F Lydian
G Mixolydian
A Aeolian
B Locrian