#2
If it's just a Strat tremolo and you're not planning on using it at all, just flip it over, unscrew the cavity cover and then tighten the screws going into the neck-end of the cavity (the screws holding the spring claw). Tighten them a whole lot and the tremolo unit will be held tightly against the body so it won't get pulled out of tune. You're then free to ditch the tremolo arm in the way you see fit.
#3
You could also put another spring or even another 2 in the same place ( the claw and trem block). I have also heard that you can wedge a piece of wood between the trem block and the side of the cavity. If you want to use it though then I think Fender make a tremelo compenator (something like that anyway) that is supposed to return it to an exact position every time.

Cheers

Alfie
#4
^The blocks of wood is a good solution, if you can cut them to size. And I didn't know that Fender made such a mechanism. Hipshot has one, though. It's called the Tremsetter and it works by helping the tremolo return to the zero point via two springs. And then there's the Tremol-No, which can transform the tremolo into a hardtail or a dive-only trem with the twist of a knob or two.
#5
Thats the one I was thinking of (Tremsetter). I thought it was a Fender product but it sounds like Hipshot is the manufacturer.

Cheers

Alfie
#7
You could always block the tremolo (also for increased sustain, I've heard).
Sincerely, Chad.
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