#1
Hey dudes.

I was playing my ESP Eclipse, when upon dropping the E to D I noticed that the A and D strings werent in tune with eachother.
Ah, intonation, I thought, so I got my tuner out and tried to intonate the bottom string.

I tuned it, made sure the 12th fret harmonic was in tune too. The 12 fretted was sharp, so I moved the saddle back, increasing the scale lenth, right?

Here comes problem #1: the saddle doesn't move back enough to get good intonation. Wtf?

When I'd messed about a bit with it, I had gotten som really bad buzzing on the 1st fretwire, when I pick the open string, which I can't get rid of. I've tried adjusting the trussrod and string height, nothing works.

I also have som buzzing, mainy on the bottom string, almost along the lenght of the fretboard, which has been there a while. I've tried to get rid of it, but even raising the action to rediculus height doesn't resolve it.

I'm gonna hand it in to a guitar tech, but I'm still a bit concerned that I couldn't resolve it myself.


I'd be very grateful if you could share your thoughts regarding this issue with me
#2
Intonation could be due to old strings

Buzzing no matter how high the action is could mean your nut has worn down and you'll need a new one or there's gunk under your strings or on your fret-board or your guitar's neck could be a bit warped or bent back.
#3
You set the intonation correctly, you're doing everything fine there. I might re-do the intonation, because if it is off that much, there is nothing you can really do to be honest.

The buzzing, is it when the guitar is plugged in or not? Mine buzzes when its unplugged (a lot of people's do) and when i have it plugged it it screams. Also, dropping the string makes it more floppy. When guys tune down to D or C or whatever, they go up in string gauge, about 1 gauge per drop.

My tremolo has 2 holes in which the saddle can be mounted. I only ever use the front holes, but on some guitars that are dropped with a trem, the saddles are moved way back.

I hope you solve the issue. Good Luck.
#4
Hey, thanks for the replys

XianXiuHong: As the intonation issue came suddenly, I think strings may have something to do with it.

I've read about the nut being worn causing buzz on the lower frets, but it seems strange, I only bought this guitar in december, and the build quality is superb.


dogismycopilot: It's unplugged, but I hear it through the amp aswell. I know about dropping making the string flap more, but the occurs in E aswell.
I should have made it clear, of course, that I'm using a T-o-M bridge.


I am going to hand it in to a tech, I just hope they can sort it out.
Thanks again for the support
#5
Quote by Corrigan
Hey dudes.

I was playing my ESP Eclipse, when upon dropping the E to D I noticed that the A and D strings werent in tune with eachother.
Ah, intonation, I thought, so I got my tuner out and tried to intonate the bottom string.

I tuned it, made sure the 12th fret harmonic was in tune too. The 12 fretted was sharp, so I moved the saddle back, increasing the scale lenth, right?

Here comes problem #1: the saddle doesn't move back enough to get good intonation. Wtf?
Since it's a standard tune-o-matic type bridge, you can remove the saddle in question and flip it end for end in order to get more scale length out of it.

When I'd messed about a bit with it, I had gotten som really bad buzzing on the 1st fretwire, when I pick the open string, which I can't get rid of. I've tried adjusting the trussrod and string height, nothing works.

I hope you didn't do this, but it says you did. How much did you crank on the truss rod? 1/4 turn is MORE THAN ENOUGH at any given time, and then the guitar needs to settle for a day or two. Also, since you're getting a fret buzz up around the first fret, the truss rod isn't the answer. Raising the nut is.

I also have som buzzing, mainy on the bottom string, almost along the lenght of the fretboard, which has been there a while. I've tried to get rid of it, but even raising the action to rediculus height doesn't resolve it.

That could be resolved with a truss rod adjustment. But you HAVE to understand how they work, and be very careful of making any adjustments with it. It's not rocket science, but you can wreck a perfectly good guitar by doing it wrong.

I'm gonna hand it in to a guitar tech, but I'm still a bit concerned that I couldn't resolve it myself.


I'd be very grateful if you could share your thoughts regarding this issue with me


*replies in blue*
#6
I am aware of the function of the trussrod, and the importance of not over doing it. I never turn it more than 1/6 turn each time.
Thanks for pointing it out though.

And thanks for the tip with the saddles. It never occured to me.