#1
Hi

I've been playing for about a year now, and have basicly been learning tabs, and trying to learn theory. Ive done quite well so far i think, but in the last couple of weeks, i find ive just been messing about on the guitar and just playing random things that come to my head on my acoustic. Sometimes i sit playing the same chord progression i made up for about an hour and just go into some sort or trance. Do you think i should go back to trying to learn tabs and theory, or is messing about sort of a good thing?
If you understood any of what i said, let me know what you think.
Cheers.
#3
yeah its good, dont block your creativity out by sticking to regimes. if it flows and feels good thats great, you'll also probably get better faster too. just watch out for when you start drooling on you guitar!
Originally posted by tylerishot
There is no reason that taking advantage of a drunk chick is acceptable. You can, however, beat them up, and tell them they fell down the stairs.
#4
It depends how you want to develop as a guitarist or musician. Different types of practice have different results. If you just sit and jam on ideas and improvise for hours on end, it won't make you into a technical master but it will help you become more creative. I suggest going back to learning theory though. Learn other peoples songs too if you want, it's up to you. Play what you enjoy playing and get most fulfillment from.
#5
I think most people here do it. However, there are definitely things you can do to make it *more* productive. Like trying humming the notes right before you play them. Or record the session and a couple of days later try to reproduce part of it just using your ear.

edit:
I think most people would say their best playing and improv is in the trance state. So if you're transcribing what you wrote try and analyze it and understand why it sounded good. For the bad parts or places you made mistakes see what went wrong(technically or musically). How could you have improved them, etc.
Last edited by capiCrimm at Mar 2, 2008,
#6
I think it's somewhat counter-productive... If you just mess around, what you're doing is pretty much just drawing inspiration out of what you already know, and maybe once in a while come up with something new, that sounds like what you already knew anyway. I've learned that the best way to become more creative is to learn new songs, from different songwriters. I'm not talking about sitting and practicing Petrucci runs with a metronome, I'm talking about learning new chord progressions, new harmonical textures, learning new arrangements, figuring out relations between guitar and bass and so on. THAT's what gives you new ideas and expands your creativity.

Picture this: The egyptian culture was unchanged for 3000 years, because they didn't mingle with the outside world and they didn't try to evolve at all.

During that time, the greeks explored science, culture and traveled to new places and kept learning new things, and they are still to this day considered maybe the most respectable and advanced culture ever.

A bit off-topic maybe, but you get the picture.
#7
Thanks for the replies. I think your all right in saying not to forget practicing songs and theory, as they will help me to be more creative.
#8

Picture this: The egyptian culture was unchanged for 3000 years, because they didn't mingle with the outside world and they didn't try to evolve at all.

During that time, the greeks explored science, culture and traveled to new places and kept learning new things, and they are still to this day considered maybe the most respectable and advanced culture ever.


I agree with the idea, however, I think you'er historically inaccurate. The egyptians culture changed a lot. They were also quite advanced in the sciences(astromomy, engineering, irrigation and farming). Did you forget about the pyramids or any of their other amazing feats? The egyptians also did mingle with other cultures, especially in the New Kingdom period.

Also, the greeks ideas didn't really come from the outside world, either. They came from the unique social dynamics of their culture. Most of their interesting contributions in philosophy, maths, etc. came long before they got the outside exposure that Rome provided them.

I don't really see one winning over the other.
Last edited by capiCrimm at Mar 2, 2008,
#9
Quote by jakecarter
just watch out for when you start drooling on you guitar!



ROFL!

yeah i find it helps, plus when you come to jam with people, you can kind of just make things up easier.
#10
Quote by capiCrimm
I agree with the idea, however, I think you'er historically inaccurate. The egyptians culture changed a lot. They were also quite advanced in the sciences(astromomy, engineering, irrigation and farming). Did you forget about the pyramids or any of their other amazing feats? The egyptians also did mingle with other cultures, especially in the New Kingdom period.

Also, the greeks ideas didn't really come from the outside world, either. They came from the unique social dynamics of their culture. Most of their interesting contributions in philosophy, maths, etc. came long before they got the outside exposure that Rome provided them.

I don't really see one winning over the other.



OMFG 100 Greeks V.S. 100 egyptian battle!!!



But honestly trancing out and fiddlin' around with a homemade scale for hours straight is how creative 'break-the-mold' music is born.
Quote by Timothy Leary
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Start a fire for a man and keep him warm for a day, start that same man on fire and he will be warm for life.
#11
Quote by capiCrimm
I agree with the idea, however, I think you'er historically inaccurate. The egyptians culture changed a lot. They were also quite advanced in the sciences(astromomy, engineering, irrigation and farming). Did you forget about the pyramids or any of their other amazing feats? The egyptians also did mingle with other cultures, especially in the New Kingdom period.

Also, the greeks ideas didn't really come from the outside world, either. They came from the unique social dynamics of their culture. Most of their interesting contributions in philosophy, maths, etc. came long before they got the outside exposure that Rome provided them.

I don't really see one winning over the other.


You make good points. What I was getting at is that the egyptian "religion" and the priesthood stressed the importance of keeping everything they way it had always been. Some changes are inevitable, but if you spread it out over 3000 years, it was a very stagnant culture, advanced as it may have been with the pyramids and astronomy and such. Just look at how the "western" culture has evolved in just 50 years.

The greeks had the benefit of being located by the mediterranean where tons of ships were constantly coming and going. I'm not trying to make myself out to be an expert in any way, just want to explain what I'm getting at.

And we're ridiculously off topic. Cheers
#12
Just look at how the "western" culture has evolved in just 50 years.


and we just recently caught up to where ancient Rome was in many areas in the past couple centuries. I mean, the Ancient Romans had a rudimentary steam engine. It took us a good 2000 years to rediscover that(and luckily better understand it's applications). Our evolution is also exponential. The Egyptians had almost nothing, whereas we millenniums of culture to build on.

As for western culture not having priests that try to suppress technology, I'll leave that alone.