#1
I want to start playing bass guitar as well but i'm trying to get the best deal out of what i can afford. I'm buying my gear down at my local guitar center and i'm wondering if i should grab one of those value packages or grab a used guitar and cheap amp. As for budget, i'm looking at around $200-$300.
Since I play electric guitar i know what to look for when i'm picking and choosing but i don't know much about bass guitars so is there anything real important i need to know when i'm looking at the different basses? And also, is some of the gear interchangeable? I know you cant use the same amp (something about blowing the speakers out, right? ) but what about pedals and cords?
#3
^ why do you have to be a jerk? Please explain in a written essay (minimum of 30 words) why I should not warn you for trying to make others feel inferior.
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#4
Cords are fine but the majority of guitar pedals sound really bad for bass. It's best to learn clean before messing about with effects anyway - get your technique good enough before trying to get crazy sounds.

There's some good suggestions of starter basses in the FAQ.
#5
as for the pickups, i see that there are several different types like soap-bar, split single, single, etc, is there any big differences between these or should i not even have to worry about it at this point?
#6
Quote by Thean4rchist
as for the pickups, i see that there are several different types like soap-bar, split single, single, etc, is there any big differences between these or should i not even have to worry about it at this point?

It depends on the tone you're looking for. The soap-bar usually has a sort of 'froggy' quality to it that you can't quite dial out. They can sound sterile or full, it all depends on how you EQ it. Most either love them or hate them. The split-single, or precision bass pickup, usually has more of a "bark" to it while the single (or Jazz bass pickup) is smoother. The precision pickup is usually more aggressive; I describe it as simply having more attitude than a jazz. As for applying any of what I just said to what you wanted, it depends on the genre you'll be playing
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#8
For some gear insight: Squire basses are excellent starter basses, I got mine for around $170. Also, for a first amp, DO NOT buy a behringer... my first amp was a 15 watt behringer and was about $40. But it was a huge piece of crap.

This is only from my limited experience.... it's still common knowledge that behringer is garbage though, stay away from it.
#10
Quote by matt-attack
I'd switch cables.
Bass cables have an extra punch to them.

A cable is a cable is a cable. You can use the same cable on an electric guitar as on your electric didgeridoo if the jack is the same size.
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#12
Bass specific cables supposedly have lower capacitance but I'm prepared to bet that's a load of marketing crap. I mean why would you make cables for guitar with a higher capacitance? It doesn't make any sense to me.

Remind me to buy one of each by the same brand and I'll test the DC resistance and the capacitance of each, but in any case the tone control on your bass will make a much bigger difference than the difference between cables.