#1
what way of recording do you recommend, a 8/16/32 track with a built in cd burner, and mixer
or to buy a desktop computer and record into it and edit on their
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#2
i use M-Audio FW solo audio interface and use a software to record into my laptop.

Having a multi-track recorder would be good. But i don't see why you'ld need it when you can record and mix directly onto your computers hard drive using ProTools, Cubase, Audacity or any good recording software.

You just pretty much need a good audio interface to get a good quality recording into ur comps hard drive. Then you can do whatever you want with it in production softwares.
#3
okay well what i mean is like a 800-1000 dollar machine that will do pretty much everything
or to go out and buy a whole new computer, recording machine, possible mixer
it's a lot more
is it worth it
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#5
yes but a different computer to keep downstairs for just recording
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#6
Get a multi-track recorder.
Record all the music onto that. Then take it upstairs to your computer, upload the music onto your computer and mix it on your comp.
#7
Get yourself one of these



Then a nice 16-track mixer and some outboard effects. You'll be all set.
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#9
Presonus Firepod. 8 simultaneous input, firewire straight into computer, use cubase to mix/eg/master. Too easy.
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#10
Quote by acdclandon
what way of recording do you recommend, a 8/16/32 track with a built in cd burner, and mixer
or to buy a desktop computer and record into it and edit on their


Unless your current computer sounds like a lawnmower, it'll be suitable for audio recording...heck, if you're just doing guitar, keyboard, drum machines, synths, and bass recordings, it CAN sound like a lawnmower and not affect your recordings. If you don't mind using lots of media to gain analog warmth, you can stick with an analog interface as Muphin mentioned above.

Now, how many tracks simultaneously are you planning to do? If it's you doing drums and singing, Atreyu style, you'll need an 8 track firewire audio interface. If it's just you singing with a guitar, two is all you need. If it's a band of friends, you can probably get up to 16-24 tracks recorded at once easily.
#11
FWIW, if you're only recording yourself, I recommend the computer. I have an analog four track, it never gets used except as a mixing board occasionally. Waste of real good money. Now I think I run the simplest and cheapest rig there is. I use guitar tracks 2 ($49) and 3pro sometimes. I run my RP 50 ($49) pedal into the line in on the back of my five year old computer on the stock sound card. If I'm feeling extra special I'll run the rockman or the Vox into the line in. Nothing fancy. Sounds real good. GT2 is a nice program. Only downfall with the computer is that I can only record from one audio source at a time. Can't have one track reading the mic input and one on the line in. I hate that. But it's great for no fuss recording. Plug in, start the GT2, switch the sound recorder to line-in and away I go. (oh, GT2 is great for making ringtones too btw)
If you're going to be recording multiple tracks simultaneously, I'd say go with the unit.
Last edited by Badorphan at Mar 4, 2008,
#12
Quote by Badorphan
I have an analog four track, it never gets used except as a mixing board occasionally. Waste of real good money.


Entire albums have been created on an analog 4-track. It's definitely a better option than the setup you describe below.

Now I think I run the simplest and cheapest rig there is. I use guitar tracks 2 ($49) and 3pro sometimes. I run my RP 50 ($49) pedal into the line in on the back of my five year old computer on the stock sound card. If I'm feeling extra special I'll run the rockman or the Vox into the line in. Nothing fancy. Sounds real good. GT2 is a nice program. Only downfall with the computer is that I can only record from one audio source at a time. Can't have one track reading the mic input and one on the line in. I hate that. But it's great for no fuss recording. Plug in, start the GT2, switch the sound recorder to line-in and away I go. (oh, GT2 is great for making ringtones too btw) If you're going to be recording multiple tracks simultaneously, I'd say go with the unit.
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I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

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Muphin > You

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#13
^True, but the computer offers me editing options that are just impossible on the four track. Oh, and the settings for each piece are saved on the computer whereas on the analog, all of the knobs and sliders are all different for everything and I can never quite get them all back correctly
Last edited by Badorphan at Mar 5, 2008,
#14
Quote by Badorphan
^True, but the computer offers me editing options that are just impossible on the four track. Oh, and the settings for each piece are saved on the computer whereas on the analog, all of the knobs and sliders are all different for everything and I can never quite get them all back correctly


In my opinion, that imperfection is much more musical than the ease of use that comes with a computer DAW.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

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