#1
Iv'e been playing guitar for about two weeks now, making some pretty good progress. Would you consider playing Ode to Joy progress or should I play more?

Right now I practice about 2 1/2 hours daily.
Should I play more?

My most importiant question may be hard to explain, but ill try.

Okay you know when you are playing a note on the fretboard, and you realease your finger. Whenever I realease my finger a small almost "aftersound" is played. It can be hard to hear, but its beggining to bother me. Is this normal, or can I fix this?


Thanks I really aprricaiate it. It's kind of hard to practice with this nagging at me.
#2
well you are using distortion it will be more evident....

you have to learn to mute strings you aren't playing and thus if you dont want to create a sound from taking your finger off a string. (i.e performing a pulloff, where you want the corresponding sound) you have to learn to mute that string immediately after you play it to reduce unwanted noise.

it takes practise but you will thank yourself later for the clean playing you will have.

hope thats what you meant!!

oh and for two weeks thats fine. you seem to practise a healthy amount and your playing nice easy songs, keep it up. As long as you being productive but enjoying it, you're practising effectively
sacrificial beaver of the laney cult

~Gear~

Schecter C-7 Hellraiser
ESP LTD F-2005
Laney VH100R *with free cab*
Roland Cube 60
Cort Acoustic
#3
Thanks for the reply

How do you mute the string? Would you stop the string with the pick? Because thats what ive been doing.

Should I practice more? If I want to get really good fast how long should I practice?
#4
haha such young passion. thats healthy.

as i said before dont practise too much. only what you think you should do but if you really want to keep playing do it for fun, it keeps your mind fresh. hell i practise for only a little bit a day then go nuts playing for hours on end, oherwise i get bored/ frustrated.

dont mute strings with the pick... it will continue to vibrate as the pick will give in to the motion and vibrate with it...this could also explain the odd "afternoise" you hear. mute with your fretting hand. how i do it is dependant on what shape my hand is in.

i gently place one my fingers, (the most comfortable and easiest) up against one of the strings i dont want to hear anymore, as to stop it vibrating, but not hard enough to depress it onto the fretboard. (causing it to create a new note)
sacrificial beaver of the laney cult

~Gear~

Schecter C-7 Hellraiser
ESP LTD F-2005
Laney VH100R *with free cab*
Roland Cube 60
Cort Acoustic
#5
Sometimes it becomes hard to hear, because i play the next note it it drowns it out.

What happens if your fingers are all being used? How would you mute?
Could stopping the sting with the pick still work though, because I was trying it and it stopped the noise.

I was tyring to avoid this becuase eventually when I get to faster stuff, the pick would need to be used somewhere else.

Does what im trying to say make sense?
#7
yeh it makes sense, but you'll have to just work out what works best for you. mute with flesh, not a pick.

you'll find with alot of techniques and skills it can under personal preference to what sounds best for you thats also the most comfortable.

people play differently to others solely because its more comfortable for them, yet they can sound the same.

experience is something people can't tell you to have, you have to earn it
sacrificial beaver of the laney cult

~Gear~

Schecter C-7 Hellraiser
ESP LTD F-2005
Laney VH100R *with free cab*
Roland Cube 60
Cort Acoustic
#8
Hmm im going to have to read up on this

Is it hard to do? How long does it take to get relativaly good at it?
#9
The little "aftersound" thing accurs a lot when im playing.
Should I do it on every note?
#10
depends how excessive it is. to be honest i really have no idea how it sounds so until i did i couldn't comment on how u should deal with it.

again up to you
sacrificial beaver of the laney cult

~Gear~

Schecter C-7 Hellraiser
ESP LTD F-2005
Laney VH100R *with free cab*
Roland Cube 60
Cort Acoustic
#12
if your not already taking them, i suggest lessons. you seem like you have too many questions that require a detailed answer and instruction.

its hard to help when i dont have you showing me exactly what you mean.

i think thats the best advice i can offer you at this point of your learning.
sacrificial beaver of the laney cult

~Gear~

Schecter C-7 Hellraiser
ESP LTD F-2005
Laney VH100R *with free cab*
Roland Cube 60
Cort Acoustic
#13
i think the "aftersound thing" you are doing is a pulloff
just u dont kinda realize it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jz-XSCrpOdY
Taylor 314CE
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ALOT of pedals
#14
Muting is something I wouldn't really worry about at only two weeks of playing. It is something that you eventually start doing subconsciously. I believe if you continue to practise consistently like you have, muting will eventually creep into your playing after about 1.5 - 2 months or so as a very rough estimate.

There are are number of techniques people use, and as was mentioned above, it all comes down to personal preference. I personally mute the strings above the string being picked with the palm of my picking hand, and the strings below the string being picked with the fingers of my fretting hand.

If you really want a temporary fix, I suppose another thing you could do is to just leave your finder lightly on the string after you play the note, i.e., when you fret the string with your first finger for instance and move to another string, release your first finger slightly so that the string is no longer fretted but allow your finger to remain on the string, lightly touching it so that it does not ring out, while you play the next note on another string. This way you will also avoid the unintentional pulloff.

I hope I made sense. Again, this is just what has worked for me, and of course there are alternatives. Your best bet would be to get a teacher at this point as you will learn much faster and avoid developing bad habits.
#15
Yeah about the teacher thing I dont have enough money yet to get lessons
I also like the challenge of being self taught, and it would allow me to form my own style better.

Overall it would be better I guess to get a teacher, but o well.

Whats a pulloff? Is it a bad thing?
#16
Pull off is when you have your fretting hand on a fret then you strum, and without strumming again you pull the string with your finger slightly so you dont need to strum to get to the next note. It's not bad, but you don't want to be doing it when you don't need to.

You don't even need a teacher, maybe someone to tell you ALL the bad habits and check to make sure if you're not picking any up.

As for teachers, I think people learn much better by themselves. Just make sure everything is smoothly played and very accurate. Do songs very slow, so slow you can't help but get them right, then bump the speed up a tiny bit. Then repeat.
#17
ive been playing for about 2 to 3 months i used used to get the same thing especially with alot of distortion and it builds up to the point where it sounds like theres static over everything you play but yeah you have to mute it i just got used t it. No probably not every note but if i get too much noise from a note i just played i mute it can be kind of hard when your playing fast though just try to make it sound as clean as possible.
#18
So then I should be using palm muting?

Also would it be a good idea to learn a song like smoke on the water for fun?

In my book ive only learned about 2 frets on the first three strings, so I i was curious if it would be to hard for me.

Thanks for the help btw
#19
my old guitarist had a theory.

and i quote..."anyone who who can't play smoke on the water the very first time they pick up a guitar shouldn't play"

he had a very lareg ego, mind.

the intro riff to smoke on the water is a great for beginners to learn about double stops and muting the strings to give the 'stop/start' feel of the riff.

nin3donian, if you wanna learn something just go learn it, no-one will try and stop you!!

don't think your limited to what you can learn based on what a book tells you your capable of, you might pick up other techniques faster than some players. for instance, i learned to tap very early in my playing. i used to play nothing but tapping for a bit because i loved the fact i could do it so well lol
sacrificial beaver of the laney cult

~Gear~

Schecter C-7 Hellraiser
ESP LTD F-2005
Laney VH100R *with free cab*
Roland Cube 60
Cort Acoustic
#20
Quote by nin3donian
So then I should be using palm muting?

Also would it be a good idea to learn a song like smoke on the water for fun?

In my book ive only learned about 2 frets on the first three strings, so I i was curious if it would be to hard for me.

Thanks for the help btw


well its should be easy but you gotta get to the point where you know your notes and no longer have to count frets but yeah the riff from smoke on the water is childs play
#21
the only thing that can really make it better because i noticed i started to have less and less of this problem as i learned to pllay cleaner playing sloppy produces alot of garbage noise in with the notes yeah you can mute them but its better not to make them at all
#22
Thanks for the help guys

Today I ran into a different problem, which kind of made it hard to play.

Whenever I would play a note on the 1st or 2nd string, I would always hear a small buzzing noise, sounding almost like something was loose. It's in tune, so thats not the problem.

Should I change my strings, or is something else the problem?
#23
fret buzz. its common.

sounds like it isn't too harsh so don't worry about it
sacrificial beaver of the laney cult

~Gear~

Schecter C-7 Hellraiser
ESP LTD F-2005
Laney VH100R *with free cab*
Roland Cube 60
Cort Acoustic
#25
if you're REALLY bugged by it, take it to a guitar tech and ask him to explain exactly whats going on because there's alot to consider. I'd be writing all day if i tried to explain it, and that wouldn't be as effective as someone used to explaining it and showing you.

i'll assume your guitar isn't a $5000 fender so i'll say this: cheaper guitar obviously aren't made as well, so you have to put up with the small (and sometimes) niggles before you get quality gear. in saying this, i personally believe that learning to play on **** gear will help understand and appreciate quality of the instrument and tone, especially tone.

people who go out and buy massive stacks and awesome guitars before they are certain its what they want and that they are worthy of playing such an instrument are silly and waste their money.

learn to play well on what's bad, and you'll always be great on whats good.
sacrificial beaver of the laney cult

~Gear~

Schecter C-7 Hellraiser
ESP LTD F-2005
Laney VH100R *with free cab*
Roland Cube 60
Cort Acoustic
#26
You must be very young. Take lessons from a good instructor. They can SHOW you answers to your questions.
Take no offense, but dont worry about where you are in 2 weeks. Guitar playing is a lifelong thing. Meaure your progress in months and years. Plan on a year or two to become proficent.
I can promise that you will feel like a dope for asking this question in about 6 months.
Play to have fun.