#1
Ok well I have been playing Guitar for about a year and a half, and I have been playing musical instruments for about seven. (so i already know how to read sheet music, scales, ect.)

So basicly I want to learn how to improvise solo guitar and have not a single clue where to start. Could someone please give me a kind crash course? And any websites, videos, ect. would also be very helpful

Thanks peoples
#3
The best thing you could do is to learn the notes of the fretboard. If you already know scales and whatnot and how to apply them (albeit with another instrument) then you should be able to apply it to guitar as well. Learning the notes on each string would definitely help with that.

Here's a little lesson I bookmarked a while back that might be able to help:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=308518&highlight=relativity

Also, once you learn the shapes for the major scale (or whatever scale you wish to practice), play that scale over and over, up and down, with a metronome. Using a metronome is key.
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#4
I see what your saying and yes I do know a few scales on guitar but the problem is when i try to make music out of a scale (ie. kinda just trying to come up with something that sounds resonable) it just comes out at either plain or crap
#6
Quote by Ninja Penguin77
I see what your saying and yes I do know a few scales on guitar but the problem is when i try to make music out of a scale (ie. kinda just trying to come up with something that sounds resonable) it just comes out at either plain or crap


You only need to know a few scales on the guitar to be able to produce great solos. I mean, look at Angus Young. He used barely more than the pentatonic scale, and his solos are awesome. Try different timings in your improvs, add some bends, slides etc. Just muck around really, that's what I tend to do, and I come up with some nice little licks here and there.
#7
Learn the sounds that different intervals create when played over different tonics. Then use this knowledge to play those intervals and get the desired sounds when playing. Learning many licks and playing them in different arrangements is not truly improvising.
#8
Simple answer: Blues. As an improvisor, you can't NOT know it. Pretty much any
improvisational path you want to take goes through the Blues. Every Blues song
has nearly the same consistent format (I-IV-V progression). It can be fairly easy
to sound good without much theory, but it can teach you a lot you need to know and
there's a lot more to it than meets the eye.
#9
Quote by edg
Simple answer: Blues. As an improvisor, you can't NOT know it. Pretty much any
improvisational path you want to take goes through the Blues.


The truth! Once you know blues, you have a stepping stone to any kind of music you want to play.

I relly believe the key is to play with a drummer and a bass player (or just a drummer for that matter). Get your scales memorized, but get a drummer who will force you to play in time and will mix up the rhythms. Jamming with other musicians is the best way to build chops. If you do not have other musicians around, then jam tracks and backing tracks are a good second choice.