#1
See above.

I can't do it. While playing slower, sure thing, but when I play very fast, I just can't seem to keep up speed while changing position with the exception of certain licks.

Is there anything specific I could do to increase my capacity to do this? I know it will come with practice, but I feel that this is specifically something I want to work on.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#2
i suppose you could practice playing simple major arpeggios going up the octave each time gives a little arpeggio workout and helps you improve your moving across the fretboard

although it seems basic it does work if you want you could do minor, diminished, augmented and whatever others you feel like
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Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
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along with fire escape routes...

#3
A good idea in this case is try a different starting place with your licks.
In other words get use to playing the same notes but higher up the neck.
Try playing the same lick down in the bottom 12 frets then the top 12 frets, and then bridge the gap between...play it on different strings for instance.
Helps to know your scales in these case, and if you practice simple licks in different fret positions and different strings you'll slowly find the fret board is easier to negotiate at speeds.
Persistance is key.
#4
@aradine: Thank you. I'll focus on some of those arpeggios.

@Muggus: Great idea. It'll help with remembering note locations, too. Thanks.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#5
How about incorporating some slides? They're a good way to change positions on the neck.
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#6
What I do is take a pattern that I use on a few strings (usually they're patterns
that I can repeat seamlessly) and then work out how to move it up &
down through all positions. Generally it involves a finger slide with either the
pinky or index finger, but sometimes you have to work out another fingeringing.

I also found that making the fingering as regular as possible through all the positions
helps. For instance some arpeggio based patterns i can use the index, middle
and ring finger on all positions except one where I'd have to use the pinky
instead of the ring. I'll make them all use the pinky if I can. It might seem awkward
at first, but it really helps a lot not to have to think of that one spot where you'll
have to change fingering.

Practice with a metronome and make sure your position shift is right in time. It's
not all that easy because everyone is so used to playing in position. Like anything
else you have to practice what you want to use.
#7
Quote by Alter-Bridge
How about incorporating some slides? They're a good way to change positions on the neck.


I already do that a lot, but I'm trying to alter my playing so that I can seamlessly run up and down or whichever way around the neck without relying on a specific technique.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.