#1
Alright I just watched Frank Gambale's video on modes and he did a brief introspective to what passing tones are, now the first time I heard passing tones was on Jordan Rudess' "Time Crunch" for the guitar solo, and I loved every bit of it.

So i'm just wondering, do passing tones HAVE to be chromatics or can you go into a completely different scale?

Like noodling through major scale midway through a minor solo.


Thanks.
hue
#2
there are two types. In scale and out of scale, but I forget the technical names.

Short answer, yes, they can definitely be out of the scale/key.
#3
Quote by sock_demon
Alright I just watched Frank Gambale's video on modes and he did a brief introspective to what passing tones are, now the first time I heard passing tones was on Jordan Rudess' "Time Crunch" for the guitar solo, and I loved every bit of it.

So i'm just wondering, do passing tones HAVE to be chromatics or can you go into a completely different scale?

Like noodling through major scale midway through a minor solo.


Thanks.


I am not entirely sure if this is how passing tones are used in a rock context, but I know the basic principles behind them in classical harmony. Firstly, in classical harmony, chords are written in such a way that one or two (occasionally three) of the voices (soprano alto tenor and bass) play each note of the chord. This will create separate melodies for each part, which are based on the chord progressions. However, smooth melody lines are generally considered more desirable. When writing out the chords, the composers usually attempt to write the voices following a large number of voice leading rules, which make the chords sound smoother. Then passing tones may be used, which are chromatic or diatonic notes not belonging to the chord, which may be accented or unaccented and are placed between two notes in one of the voices to make the progression smoother between those voices. These tones being non-harmonic tones will cause dissonance, which can add beauty to a piece, but also sound terrible if used improperly. There are again a whole bunch of rules to know about when and where to use passing tones.
#4
^^Well everything he said was correct, but here's the thing. A passing tone is just one type of non-chord tone. What makes it a passing tone is specifically that it moves in step-motion either up or down between chords. So...if the note in-between the chords 1)moves by step up/down AND 2)is not part of either chord it's between. Then you've got yourself a passing tone. Hope it helps.

EDIT: I read my post over and thought it was confusing. So I thought I'd add an example. Say we're in the Key of C and it's a V-I progression(triads). If the melody goes G-F-E then F is a passing tone cuz 1)it's moving up in steps AND 2)F is not part of GBD(V) or CEG(I). Also, F is diatonic to C, however it is still a non-chord tone in this case.
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Last edited by KryptNet at Mar 3, 2008,