#1
I still new to the guitar and was wondering how people create chord progressions to create songs. How do they know which ones work and what doesn't. Is there any technical formula one applies to it? Thank you!
#3
Isn't there some formula you use to see which ones go good together or not? Then what is the Roman Numerals and WWHWWWH in chord progression stuff then?
#4
If you want to know what chords go in a key, here is one formula. For the C major scale it would be I(Cmaj) ii(dmin) iii(emin) IV(Fmaj) V(Gmaj) vi(amin) viio(Bdim).
12 fret fury
#8
Quote by lbc_sublime
^ my guess would be

min dim maj min min maj maj

That would be correct. But rather then just memorizing those patterns you'll want to understand why it works like that. If you're too lazy to leave this site, I recommend reading "The Crusades" Column, as a starting block for this stuff.
#9
i personaly don't use to many patterns to beginthings, but understand enouph to put things together my self and understand why it is like that
song stuck in my head today


#10
i think he wants to know about interval progressions... do u know about cadences there???
Most progressions are based off of a scale... 1 4 5 is a pretty comon progression.. altho a little boring. So if u were using the C major scale that would be C (first interval) F (4th) G (5th)
#11
and if you were using the g major scale it would be G C and D =P lol no wonder why that always sounded good
#13
I think chord leading and cadences are the things that really get chord progressions going. I'd wiki or google 'chord leading' if you want to understand some of the deeper theory behind it.

I've been away from UG for a few years (dragged away by sixth form and uni work) but a long time ago before I disappeared, there was a thread where Cas (i think it was him anyway...) wrote some really good stuff about chord leading, any ideas what might have happened to it? Archived, sunk to the bottom of the lists, or just disappeared?
Last edited by Mad_BOB at Mar 4, 2008,
#14
The way I do it is by looking at the theory aspect of it.

The most common progressions are I IV V chords (root, subdominant and dominant) chords.

Example, in C major the root chord is C Major, the subdominant is F major and the dominant is G7.

Then I add chords or alter the formulas.. I change them depending on where I want cadences, so sometimes I have a diminished seventh chord going to the root or an augmented chord going to a minor chord.... I experiment a lot and use conventions then see where I can go with them. Im not too hot on my harmony but Im getting there.
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!