#1
Okay, so I was thinking about 7-strings and all the cool stuff i could do with it if i had one (gotta get better so i deserve it ) and i starting thinking about tunings if it had a floyd rose/ floating trem.

now say i wanted to play arch enemy (yes i know they dont use 7 strings), they tune two steps down, so that would be C F Bb Eb G C. now naturally if you have a floyd rose, tuning a six string to that takes a while. Enter the 7 string guitar and stick a capo on the first fret. Now the tuning from lowest to thinnest is C F Bb Eb Ab C F. Well, thats all fine and dandy except for...

Ab? why??? why does every other string work but the damn g string is one semitone too high. i remember my guitar teacher briefly telling me why when tuning in standard you have to use the 4th fret instead of the 5th for the g string. but i forgot, lol.

so can u guys help me out? sorry for long post
#3
its tuned like that for making chord shapes easier,
and ive messed around with the capo-semitone up trick :d it gets boring after a while, but 7 strings are awesome
#4
i was thinking the same ting what you have to do is invent your 7 string capo and market it and make a like a jillion dollars
#5
Low B to low E is a perfect 4th.
Low E to A is a perfect fourth.
A to D is a perfect fourth.
D to G is a perfect fourth.
G to B, however, is a major third. One semitone lower than a perfect fourth. So, in essence the top two strings are one semitone high from a perfect fourth tuning. When you add a capo to the seven string guitar, your B is replacing what "arch enemy" tunes their E to, your E is replacing their A, and so on, so your G string is inheriting the flaws in their tuning.
My Gear
Ibanez RG7321
Ibanez RG520QS
'78 Ibanez Les Paul copy
Schecter Hellraiser Tempest
Fender Telecaster
Vantage Semihollow
Line6 AX2 212 combo modeling amplifier