#1
Well I have a problem that I don't know how to fix and maybe someone can share their wisdom.

Pretty much my sound, live, sucks. I'm not purely talking about tone. Whenever I play some licks and not make any mistakes I get these annoying fret slide sounds, and other annoying sounds that aren't pleasing. I thought garbage amps produce bad sounds, so I use my friends Les Paul through a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier and still humming even though they were humbuckers. Then when I crank it up, the noise is just noise, even if I do something like Back In Black, it just sounds like mud. The same with clean channel playing.

It's weird because I see people play live like Jeff Beck, Joe Bonamassa, BB King, Clapton, Kenny Burrell, etc., etc. that "never" make a mistake. Which I don't believe, but it's hardly noticeable. You also don't hear that sliding when they play. What can I do to get a good sound live, or anytime in general I guess, though there really isn't a problem when the volume is down...
Gear:
Fender Stratocaster Standard
Fender Blues Jr.
#4
sounds like you need to learn how to play cleanly.

what you do is, when youre switching from one string, or your moving your hand, mute all of the strings at the bridge with your palm, and then move your hand. takes ages to get used to but tis the only thing i can think of.
#5
you gotta mess around with your amps man ... only you can figure out what sounds good to you.
#6
Mid's always help. As sound pressure increases the perception of mid's drop faster than the rest of the frequency's.
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#7
Quote by CobenBlack
sounds like you need to learn how to play cleanly.

what you do is, when youre switching from one string, or your moving your hand, mute all of the strings at the bridge with your palm, and then move your hand. takes ages to get used to but tis the only thing i can think of.


I hate playing with my hand on the bridge, I can't get good speed with that.
Gear:
Fender Stratocaster Standard
Fender Blues Jr.
#8
A. You suck too much to play with distortion.
B. You don't know how to tweak your amp right.
C. You need a noisegate.
D. All of the above.
1992 Gibson Explorer (Seymour Duncan '59 neck, Custom Custom bridge)
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Mesa/Boogie Nomad 55
Mesa/Boogie 412 Recto. O/S Cabinet
Boss ME-50
MXR 10-Band EQ
#9
Quote by HavokStrife
A. You suck too much to play with distortion.
B. You don't know how to tweak your amp right.
C. You need a noisegate.
D. All of the above.



don't be a douche. he asked how he can change this so try to help him out or don't say anything at all.


try to jam for a little and mess around with the knobs on your amp till you find a sound that you like.

as the other person said, turn you tone knob down a little. that can produced many un-wanted sounds.

and playing with your hand close to the bridge will help with muting other strings that you are not using atm, and will help you sound cleaner.

best of luck.
#10
He isn't a douche, he just stated the obvious.

My biggest advice in these situations is to play with your own amp. Do not borrow an amp just for a stage show, especially when you don't know how to set it up. Try less gain, or try borrowing his amp for a couple of days before the show to set it up right, maybe he can help you out with it.
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#11
- You should try box position when playing lead, or avoid sliding, you know, guitars w/ distortion are very sensitive to those kinds of motion
- Use gibson marshall, it does not produce much feed back
- Use a high quality pedal like Zooms for the same reason as above
- Maybe its because of the wires you use
- Balance the distortion, gain, level, and volume
#12
Upload some samples of the unwanted sounds? It seems you are describing more than a harsh high sound that occurs when sliding your hand. Generally that would not sound muddy.
#13
Quote by goulde shaw

Pretty much my sound, live, sucks. I'm not purely talking about tone. Whenever I play some licks and not make any mistakes I get these annoying fret slide sounds, and other annoying sounds that aren't pleasing.


It's very doubtful it has anything to do with your equipment. You're looking
everywhere except in the mirror.

Those good players sound that way because they have control of thier sound. They
have that both through preparation and force of will. You don't have that control.
They almost surely do make mistakes, it's just not the same kind of mistakes you're
making and they also realize a mistake can turn into an opportunity.
#14
i think every one here is right.. less gain, less tone, less mids, mute when u move yr figner position or lift hand dont slide it ..... and consider getting a noise gate
#15
Your problem is probably that you do not practice as loud as your shows, so you therefore do not notice the noise at home.
I have nothing witty to say here at the moment

Expect a change soon
#16
Quote by domenic_665
- You should try box position when playing lead, or avoid sliding, you know, guitars w/ distortion are very sensitive to those kinds of motion

uh, no, if you know how to play properly it shouldn't be a problem
Quote by domenic_665

- Use gibson marshall, it does not produce much feed back

whats a gibson marshall? is it a guitar or an amp? please don't post if you don't really know what you're talking about, it doesn't help anyone
Quote by domenic_665
- Use a high quality pedal like Zooms for the same reason as above

high quality compared to what? imo boss and roland products blow zoom out of the water, i personally wouldn't go on stage with anything by zoom
Quote by domenic_665

- Maybe its because of the wires you use

do you mean guitar cable? cable running from the head to the cab? wires in the guitar? wires in the amp head? all of the above
Quote by domenic_665
- Balance the distortion, gain, level, and volume

this really won't have anything to do with it. feedback maybe to a degree (and i use a boss mt2 metal zone cranked way up and the volume on my amp cranked way up oftentimes with far too much distortion and i still don't have problems with feedback. in fact i'd like more sometimes

now......

i go with what Edg said, it's all about how you play. i play anywhere from clean to slightly crunchy to distorted to drenched distortion and i don't have a problem because my technique for playing is proper.
#17
Hi..

I am also a Beginner, I don't have technical answer, but I would like to share some thing to you, My uncle always says to me -
"Practicing does not make perfect, it makes permanent. That makes the time you spend playing your guitar all the more important. Don't waste your time fiddling around on your guitar. Dig in and learn something that will aid you on your quest for musical success. Set goals and work towards achieving them. Whether it's technique, tricks, or a new song, you can become better just by using your time more wisely."
#18
I played out live in heavy band for two years (just quit the band a few months ago) in all kinds of different venues/situations, and here are my tips:

1. Louder is not better. Definition is what you need the most - and seems to be what you're having the most trouble with. As has been said, the most important part of achieving clean, clear definition is your playing. So thats your #1 priority.

But once you achieve that, know that you don't need to make it balls loud. If it can be clearly heard over the drums, you're fine. Often times playing too loud not only takes away from the overall mix, but your own sound as well.

2. Always use less gain than you think you need. When I first started playing I used a ton of gain and thought it sounded good, but then I realized that I was the only one lol. Mids are the same way. You need a lot of mids to achieve better definition. So generally, go for less gain and more mids.

3. Every venue is different. No two are going to sound the same, and your amp is going to sound surprisingly different with every room you play it in. So don't just dial in an EQ that you think sounds best and keep it like that for all your shows.

You need to adjust it differently for every different place you play. Just turn the knobs, get a good sound with your ear right to the speakers, and then walk out to the front of the stage or preferably onto the floor to hear it from out there.

4. If you need a noise gate, I personally believe you're just not EQing it right and/or are too loud. I never used a noise gate and my sound was always fine, even with the crappy SS amp I was using (we were very poor). It mainly got by because I never turned it up past 3. My sound was always very clear and yes, defined, so I didn't need to turn it up. But sometimes you really do just need a noise gate. So look into that if you just can't work it out by better EQing and leveling.

I think that mainly covers it. Really IMO 90% of live sound problems can be fixed with better EQing. Even if you don't necessarily like he tone you're getting, it doesn't matter if its not clear and discernible. If people can't hear what you're playing they aren't going to care how mean your overdrive sounds. Oh and ALWAYS be respectful and nice to the sound guy, even if hes doing bad. Thats a cardinal rule.
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#19
Like everyone else said, use less gain. And technique really will make a big difference- practice with a clean tone until it sounds immaculate before considering a distorted sound. Distortion only amplifies mistakes, doesn't really help at all.
Quote by corduroyEW
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