#1
Hey,
I've just read through the 'theory for beginners' article and I have a basic understanding of the circle of fiths and how to make chords. The article also told me how to technically make a major scale using tones and semitones. Now say i wanted to make a C major scale I would start on the 8th fret of the low E and go tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone ?
If i did that the scale would only go over a string or two.

So how do I find where to put the scale on the fretboard ?
My mate said something about patterns but I didn't really understand him.
Gear:
Orange tiny terror
ENGL 2x12 cab
PRS Singlecut
MXR GT OD
#2
box shapes are fairly easy once you get the hang of them.

You have four fingers, so it's best to limit yourself to four frets of space. Because each string up is a perfect 4th this shouldn't be difficult for your Major Scale.

Start on the 8th fret of your low E with your middle finger. Then go for the 10th fret with your pinky.

From here the next note is not on this string but the next as you don't want to be moving your hand position at all, so use your index for the 7th fret on the A. Then your middle for the 8th and pinky for the 10th.

Having come to the pinky move up another string, only this time you're after the 7th, 9th and 10th strings.

Play it through quickly and it should sound familiar.

Now identify the notes of the scale and, sticking between the 7th-10th frets, work on where those notes are in ascending order on those last three strings, there you have your box shapes.

There's lessons that explain it better, but I don't have searching time.
#3
So this box shape can be used for any major scale.
If I wanted and G major scale, I would do the same thing but on the 3rd fret ?
Gear:
Orange tiny terror
ENGL 2x12 cab
PRS Singlecut
MXR GT OD
#4
Exactly yes.

F is interesting for a beginner. Everywhere your index finger would be is an open string.

Scales, because of the four fret business, are a great way to train that pinky of yours.

Personally I have a wall chart of Major scales with the Major/Minor boxes pencilled around. That's how I learned them. Once you practise though, you'll find it's in your head forever.
#5
oh sweet!
Good idea with the pencil to, I might see if i can find one at the music shop.
Thanks dude.
Gear:
Orange tiny terror
ENGL 2x12 cab
PRS Singlecut
MXR GT OD
#6
If you like that idea I would suggest making your own same as I did. Work out your scales, get some graph paper and write 1-(about)17 on the left. Replace 0 with Open and 12 with octave and fill in all those gaps with the correct note. After that find your root on the low E and make your box shapes. Try working out the minor shape for yourself, though you have to actually move your hand on the G for that one.
#7
Is it worth taking the time to figure out and make ?
Gear:
Orange tiny terror
ENGL 2x12 cab
PRS Singlecut
MXR GT OD
#8
What better way is there to learn than to force yourself to look at it, copy it, then work out how to use it?

It depends how best you learn. If your ear is trained best just play scales all over and you'll begin to identify the notes. If you're best trained with muscles work out your root note and just go from there. If you're best trained using your eyes it's definately worth the time. If need be just put up one for A Minor and put your A Minor and C Major box shapes on it. Wouldn't really take long, but might not be that effective for you.
#9
Quote by howey
Hey,
I've just read through the 'theory for beginners' article and I have a basic understanding of the circle of fiths and how to make chords. The article also told me how to technically make a major scale using tones and semitones. Now say i wanted to make a C major scale I would start on the 8th fret of the low E and go tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone ?
If i did that the scale would only go over a string or two.

So how do I find where to put the scale on the fretboard ?
My mate said something about patterns but I didn't really understand him.


The easy answer.

1 - find a C note
2 - follow the pattern of intervals from that C note.

that's all there is to it, it's just that you need to learn the notes on the fretboard before tackling scales. At the moment you're trying to learn to spell without knowing the alphabet.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
Quote by steven seagull
The easy answer.

1 - find a C note
2 - follow the pattern of intervals from that C note.

that's all there is to it, it's just that you need to learn the notes on the fretboard before tackling scales. At the moment you're trying to learn to spell without knowing the alphabet.

+1
Once you know the notes of the scale u also know u can use those same notes everywere on the fretboard. Never mind this boxes stuff thats for phrasing not a crutch
#13
Quote by jesus is punk N
yes but u learn the scale before u learn way to phrase it... DAH


Learning a scale is learning intervals, which is learning how to phrase. Your box shape is also the easiest way, in my opinion, to put yourself into a position where you can play it as a speed exercise, get your pinky into even practise with the rest of your fingers and into a position where you can train your ear. It is also a good place to start for soloing, progressive and also is a good way to train scales all across the fretboard using different notes.

I teach how I learnt. It worked for me so that's how I teach. If you disagree with my methods teach your own instead of mocking mine and ignoring the query of the thread.
#14
im not mocking u, ur just giving crappy advice. Its much better to know all the notes in a scale than some box that hel end up stuck in because he doesnt understand he can go any were on the fretboard... what kind of solo or shred doesnt go up and down the fretboard?? u cant just think horizantle u have to think verticle
#15
boxes help you USE the scale, but they're not great for helping you learn the scale itself.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#16
well you can connect the boxes to go vertical if you want then once you understand how all the boxes connect you just start on whatever root you want and start going up the boxes...right?
#17
Quote by rodyrdz
well you can connect the boxes to go vertical if you want then once you understand how all the boxes connect you just start on whatever root you want and start going up the boxes...right?

Yes but its better if yr just getting into this to learn the friggen scale first and the biggest mistake guitarist make starting is getting stuck in the box... GET OUT OF THE BOX LOL dont learn boxes to learn scales learn scales and than learn boxes to help u with the phrasing of yr scales
#18
So how do I find where to put the scale on the fretboard ?


Learn the notes all over the fretboard, and then learn the notes in the scale.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
Either you guys have explained it to me and I havn't noticed or ... none of you know what I'm talking about.

This is how I see the C major scale at the moment.
I've done it wrong, I mean on the low E.

How do i get that into an actual scale pattern ?
Gear:
Orange tiny terror
ENGL 2x12 cab
PRS Singlecut
MXR GT OD
#20
How do i get that into an actual scale pattern ?


Learn the notes all over the fretboard, and then learn the notes in the scale.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#21
I see absolutely nothing wrong with that chart. Keep it as a template for future reference. Take out all the sharps/flats/accidentals and leave those boxes empty and you'll have a perfect chart of C Major.

Highlight the C notes if you want to show roots for scale harmonising (create chords using your scale) and you've got it. Anything you play that includes any variation of only those seven notes is in the C Major scale.
#22
Awesome I understand it now !
Now when playing the in key of C and using the chords within, am I only supposed to play leads within the C major scale ?
Gear:
Orange tiny terror
ENGL 2x12 cab
PRS Singlecut
MXR GT OD
#23
There are some variations but if you're in that key then C Major is your safest bet. Generally it's anything containing those notes so you could also use the Pentatonic variant, which is your C Major minus the 2nd and the 6th I believe.

So it would be :
C E F G B

Which is popular for the shape and ease and that most of the box shapes are great for hammer ons and pull offs.
#24
Well, umm... apply the fifth fret rule for tuning, until you discover the box pattern, which means that you don't have to move your hands horizontally on the fret board, at first it will be really time-consuming, but you'll get used to it...