#1
Hey,

I have just purchased a DVD teaching the guitar (Lick Library "The Mechanics of the Electric Guitar")

And I am in the first lesson which gives the C Major Chord and the scale built around it.

From what I can tell this is how he played it:

X
3
2
0
1
X

Which is all good because it matched up to his scale and what he said about the notes in the chord only coming from the scale he played.

However I then read my chord book and see C Major like this:

X
3
2
0
1
0

The first string wasn't in the small scale that he showed on the DVD, so why does it get strummed? Am I missing something :s


Majorly confused :p
Last edited by RyanGillam at Mar 4, 2008,
#2
You can strumm it, however you don't really need to. The first string open is the note e, which is a part of the C chord. You already play an e (just an octave lower) on the d string (2. fret). Most of the time that chord is being played WITH the open high e string. You can even play the open low e string additionally if you want.
#3
the book is wrong about the 5th string, 3rd fret. It is C not G. On a side note a C chord is made of C, E, and G. Any chord you play containing these (and only these) three notes (and any octaves of them) is a Cmajor chord (but may be inverted. i.e, G is the lowest note instead of C). Just a little insight, I'm not trying to confuse you. If you want me to explain better then I can try.
Stop whining and learn your theory!

Quote by oddhawk676
Yeah, some black guy with a yankees cap walks into the ice cream parlor, and I said "We dont serve your kind here," as in, yankee fans, i guess he thought something else and left.
#4
By playing that high string (the e) open you are playing an E note. This is a note that you ar alredy playing in your chord. So what is the difference? None!


I know its crazy. One thing that you will learn through the wonders of guitar, there are several different ways to play the sam chord.

By playing that high note it might change the sound a little but it really just the same chord.

A slightly more complex explanation folows.

Chords are just playing three notes at a time. In a C chord these notes are C E and G. Regardless of how you play these notes it will be a C chord. So the first chord you have the notes are

C--3
E--2
G--0
C--1
Notice that is has all the notes of a C major chord. The fun thing is you can add as many C's E's ot G's to it and it will still be a C chord

C--3
E--2
G--0
C--1
E--0

or
G--3
C--3
E--2
G--0
C--1
E--0

hope this helps
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#5
I think the main source of your confusion is you might be reading the string diagrams a little wrong. The 5th string 3rd fret refers either to the A string fretting C, or the B string fretting D. Regardless, neither of these provide the nothing but confusion. The note G is found on the third fret, sixth -OR- first string. The high and low E strings have the exact same tuning so their notes progress in the same order.

As for the C chord, here is the proper fingering for the most common form.

x E
3 a
2 d
0 g
1 b
0 e
#6
Quote by PekarGuitar
the book is wrong about the 5th string, 3rd fret. It is C not G. On a side note a C chord is made of C, E, and G. Any chord you play containing these (and only these) three notes (and any octaves of them) is a Cmajor chord (but may be inverted. i.e, G is the lowest note instead of C). Just a little insight, I'm not trying to confuse you. If you want me to explain better then I can try.


I worked out why the book was wrong. It numbers the strings in reverse order, which is annoying to say the least!

And thanks for the help guys
#7
yeah you will find that most places will put the order like this
e
B
G
D
A
E
Stop whining and learn your theory!

Quote by oddhawk676
Yeah, some black guy with a yankees cap walks into the ice cream parlor, and I said "We dont serve your kind here," as in, yankee fans, i guess he thought something else and left.