#1
what scale/s was/were used in the:
'wherever i may roam' intro by metallica,
'rain forest' michael angelo batio(incase u havent heard it )
and other similarly 'exotic' sounding riffs? is there any other way of making a riff sound more 'exotic'?

thanks in advance

P.S i have read the stickies.....

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#4
There's this scale used a lot by Dick Dale and CoB, but I don't know what it's called. I only know the intervals. In number of frets: 1, 3, 1, 2, 1, 3, 1.
Quote by lizarday
oh yeah? well larry king the slayer guitarist owns bc rich guitars. (i think)
#5
+1 to the other posts, that's usually the "middle-eastern" sounding scale. Use of legato, fast bends, and good vibrato can help get that feel too. It really has a lot to do with phrasing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abS960I67TE

That's Vai showing some weird phrasings that really help give an environment. And check out minor harmonic scales, they easily give you that kinda sound.
#6
c phyrigian would be C bD bE F G bA bB C
e phyrigian would be E F G A B C bD D E

right? im a theory noob....im trying to learn it tho

EDIT: ive tried harmonic minor but it seems to...normal.. goddam malmsteen! :P

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#7
its learning how to use 7 notes creativly to make it not sound so bland that's the hard part.

learning a scale isn't going to make you sound like malmsteen
#8
^ E phrygian is
E F G A B C D

which is used in the intro and most of Wherever i may roam

E phrygian dominant is used for the solo
#9
i know how to use scales to write i just wanted to add more to my arsenal!

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#11
it sounds different, but not exotic is what i mean peaceful rocker, i listen to malmsteen all the time so it sounds quite normal to me...

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost