#1
ok all i now is that sweep picking is a broken down chord or scale, could someone please tell me whether to make a pattern u need to use an existing scale or chord?

any kind of help on sweep picking would be appreciated,

thnx
#3
i dunno im just so confused on what u can use for sweep picking. and i dont know any scales lol
#4
well you can just go to websites like cyberfret.com or something and they have like patterns to practice for sweeping, there's another good site but i forgot...
i know patterns but its kinda hard to show online haha
#7
CEG

DFA

EGB

FAC

GBD

ACE

BDF

here some triads to 'sweep pick...' ( i hate that word)
#8
what you are "sweeping" is just a chord (most of the time a bar chord).
so just take a chord and "sweep it"
because all these "patterns" are are chords
so yes, you use an existing chord

heres a site for some arpeggios
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/arpeggio.php

hope it helps
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#10
Quote by ouchies
No matter what you do, it will end up being a chord.


exactly
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#11
sweeping is were u pick a pattern across the neck, were u always hit the next string after each note. for example E 5 A 5 D 5 G 7 B 7 e 5 B7 G7 D5 A5 E5 ( thats not a reall riff i just made that up
#12
Sweep picking is playing an arpeggio, which is playing a chord note by note, rather than strumming.

A chord is made up of a number of intervals, a major chord is made up of the root note, the major 3rd, and the perfect 5th. The minor chord is made up of the root, minor 3rd, and perfect fifth.

So a common sweeping pattern, and one of the best to start out with, would be a major chord in the key of c.

e---------12-15-12--------
b-----13-------------13----
g-12--------------------12-

Now, if you look at each note here. We have (ascending), G, C, E, G. The root note is c, the major third is E, and the perfect fifth is G. Thats pretty much how you construct a sweeping pattern. If you want to use a minor pattern, pick a root note, find it's minor third (3 frets up), then find it's perfect fifth (7 frets up).

Then just find a place on the fretboard where those notes are in a sequence where it is possible to sweep them. Same with diminished (root, maj 3rd, dim 5th), augmented (root, maj 3rd, augmented 5th/ min 6th) or any other combination of intervals.

Personally, when writing a solo that contains both sweeping and fast shredding parts, I'll just build the arpeggios based on whatever scale(s) I'm using. Thats not really the traditional way to do it, but your basically doing the same thing. If your using a diminished scale, if the pattern contains the note that is the diminished 5th, it'll be a diminished arpeggio.
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At the altar of Rock N Roll you kneel
A slave who forever Rocks
Is chained in the Devil's locks
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#13
Quote by ouchies
No matter what you do, it will end up being a chord.

not really
what about 2 note sweeps?? they aren't chords
#15
Quote by edg
Sweep picking most definitely does NOT have anything to do with arpeggios
or chords. It's just that, that's where it's most frequently applied. You can sweep
anything that involves 1 pick on every string and moves to adjacent strings. It
can be anything really.


exactly
but i believe he is referring to sweeping arpeggios
not sweeping in general
i may be wrong
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#17
If you play any more than two notes (or three, whatever) together, they become a chord. If you play those notes one at a time, it is an arpeggio. No matter what you sweep, anywhere on the fretboard, any ridiculous pattern, it's still an arpeggio. If you sweep pick and just barre the 12th fret, it's still an arpeggio.

I say to learn sweep picking based on chords and arpeggios, because it generally helps when writing a solo section. Instead of just guessing and trying around different sweeping patterns, you can look at the notes you want to play and already know what notes will sound dissident, what notes will harmonize right, and the right key to play in. If thats not doing it for you, your always left with tossing theory to the side and winging it.
The gods you worship are Steel
At the altar of Rock N Roll you kneel
A slave who forever Rocks
Is chained in the Devil's locks
AND SLAIN BY THE BLOODY AXE I WHAIL!
#18
Quote by DeathMask
If you play any more than two notes (or three, whatever) together, they become a chord. If you play those notes one at a time, it is an arpeggio.


Then, I guess by that definition, whether you sweep or are just alt picking any
notes in any melody line whatsoever, once you've played 3 or more notes
together (and by together, I suppose you mean some arbitrarily short time) you're
playing an arpeggio.

It's an interesting idea, but it does seem to make any special meaning the word
arpeggio has, meaningless.
#19
Quote by ouchies
I wouldn't really call it a sweep if its just two notes.. and it will be implying a chord no matter what.

really?? even if i play the same 2 notes across all 6 strings??
#20
Quote by edg
Then, I guess by that definition, whether you sweep or are just alt picking any
notes in any melody line whatsoever, once you've played 3 or more notes
together (and by together, I suppose you mean some arbitrarily short time) you're
playing an arpeggio.

It's an interesting idea, but it does seem to make any special meaning the word
arpeggio has, meaningless.


Well, I mean. If you play a melody line like this:
e-----------------------------12-14-10-
b-----------------14-12-11-------------
g---------17-14-------------------------
d-14-15---------------------------------
It would not be considered an arpeggio.

But if you played something like this
e---------13----13-12-13------------
b-----15----15------------15---------
g-14---------------------------14-----
d-----------------------------------12-

It would be an arpeggio, you could even add a couple more notes on the dgb strings and it would still be considered an arpeggio. Because the notes are derived from a chord and it's intervals, this one is based on the d minor.
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At the altar of Rock N Roll you kneel
A slave who forever Rocks
Is chained in the Devil's locks
AND SLAIN BY THE BLOODY AXE I WHAIL!
#21
Quote by DeathDealer
really?? even if i play the same 2 notes across all 6 strings??


Sure, for example, if you played a C and E it would be a C Major, obviously.. C and its major 3rd would be implying a CM chord.. if you played a C and D it wouldn't be as obvious, it would depend on the context. It could be a CM/Cm9 or CM/cm add 9, DM/dm 11, DM/dm add 11, etc.
#22
Quote by DeathMask

It would be an arpeggio, you could even add a couple more notes on the dgb strings and it would still be considered an arpeggio. Because the notes are derived from a chord and it's intervals, this one is based on the d minor.


My point is, there's absolutely no reason to derive anything from a chord. Sweeping
is just playing adjacent strings with a single pick stroke in 1 direction. No matter
what notes you pick. Conversely, you can play arpeggio's entirely without sweeping
(and that's done all the time).
#23
Quote by ouchies
Sure, for example, if you played a C and E it would be a C Major, obviously.. C and its major 3rd would be implying a CM chord.. if you played a C and D it wouldn't be as obvious, it would depend on the context. It could be a CM/Cm9 or CM/cm add 9, DM/dm 11, DM/dm add 11, etc.

as i understood it, a chord needed 3 notes to be a chord
so lets say i arrange my tuning to be able to play 1 note on all strings, how bout now??
#24
Quote by DeathDealer
as i understood it, a chord needed 3 notes to be a chord
so lets say i arrange my tuning to be able to play 1 note on all strings, how bout now??


A chord needs 3 notes to be a chord, but that doesn't mean you imply chords by omitting notes from that chord.

Well in that case I guess you would just be playing that note. But that would be pretty useless and inefficient.
#25
Quote by ouchies
A chord needs 3 notes to be a chord, but that doesn't mean you imply chords by omitting notes from that chord.

Well in that case I guess you would just be playing that note. But that would be pretty useless and inefficient.

inefficient but still a sweep
i was just curious anyway
#26
e---------13----13-12-13------------
b-----15----15------------15---------
g-14---------------------------14-----
d-----------------------------------12-
A---------------------------------------
E---------------------------------------

Something like this is an arpeggio.

e---------13----13-12-13------------
b-----15----15------------15---------
g-14---------------------------14-----
d-----------------------------------12-
A---------------------------------------
E---------------------------------------
....D--------.U-----..D...U-------------

Would be a way to use sweep picking to play an arpeggio


e---------13----13-12-13------------
b-----15----15------------15---------
g-14---------------------------14-----
d-----------------------------------12-
A---------------------------------------
E---------------------------------------
...D...U...D...U..D...U...D.U..D..U

Is the same arpeggio, without sweep picking

Now I will show a way use sweep picking while not playing an arpeggio.

A-----------3-
G---------3---
F--------3----
E------3------
D----3--------
C--3----------
..D------------

That is a way to sweep pick while playing a scale. People should agree with me that this is not an arpeggio, and yet it is still being sweeped. Of course this would not be easy to play with an common tuning, but it emphasises the point that sweep picking is a technique, which involves using one continues motion to play several individual notes rather, than what many people think it is, which is "playing arpeggios".