#1
I've read the MT sticky (it was probably one of the best uses of a few hours I've had for awhile, now I can actually improv, and it sounds, ya know, somewhat decent!! Lol but seriously it's amazing)

Ok, I have a question about modes. When you take a scale (lets say C for simplicties sake) and use a mode in combination, how does it go?

Example

C scale (natural)

C, D, E, F, G, A, B.

Now if we apply the Lydian (#4) mode to it, this is where I'm confused. (again, Lydian for simplicities sake.)

Is it

F, G, A, C, D, E.

Or, do you sharpen the 4th note of the C natural scale, then begin on F? (You would end up with: F#, G, A, B, C, D, E)

So basically I'm confused with the order of how we do things.

Do you

A. Start on the 4th (b/c it's Lydian) and then sharpen the forth note of THAT scale

EX:

F, G, A, B, C, D, E

Do you do that (order it with F as the tonic), then sharp b?

Or

B. Do you sharpen the 4th note of the C natural scale (F) then apply the starting ending points. If you do it this way, you change keys from C to F#.


I'm really sorry if this is confusing, but I've printed out the guide and read it quite a few times and am really not getting this one specific thing

Also, does anyone know of a website with all scales and chords in every key, mode, position etc?
Last edited by edusty2010 at Mar 4, 2008,
#4
I think I have an answer. Now don't flame me, because I could be wrong... but I think it would be easier to think of the formulas for the modes revolving around changes from the major scale. F Major is F G A Bb C D E F. Now, to form F Lydian, you raise the fourth note a half step, which results in F G A B C D E F. I think what you are doing is a cross between C Lydian and F Lydian, which isn't any mode that I can think of. So to answer your question, you start on the fourth, and sharpen the fourth note of that scale. Once again, I could be wrong.
#5
dude you're making this WAYYYY to complicated. All you do is play the C major scale again, but with F# instead of regular F.
Play:
C, D, E, F#, G, A, B

EDIT: /\ yeah, except for the very end. You don't 'start' on the fourth. I have no idea where you're getting that. You start on one, the root. In this case, it is C. That will never change, or else you won't even be in the key of C... All you do is play the exact same thing but with a sharp fourth instead of the regular fourth.
Last edited by rush5757 at Mar 4, 2008,
#6
everything is compared to the major scale so to make C major into C lydian you take the C major scale and sharp the fourth. C D E F# G A B

the fourth inversion of the C major scale is F G A B C D E. which is equivalent to the F Lydian scale.
#7
Quote by rush5757
dude you're making this WAYYYY to complicated. All you do is play the C major scale again, but with F# instead of regular F.
Play:
C, D, E, F#, G, A, B

EDIT: /\ yeah, except for the very end. You don't 'start' on the fourth. I have no idea where you're getting that. You start on one, the root. In this case, it is C. That will never change, or else you won't even be in the key of C... All you do is play the exact same thing but with a sharp fourth instead of the regular fourth.


Just to clarify, that was F Lydian that I was illustrating. The scale you transcribed was C Lydian. I was just answering his question.
#8
Quote by tremper6
Just to clarify, that was F Lydian that I was illustrating. The scale you transcribed was C Lydian. I was just answering his question.

Oh! My mistake, you're right.
#10
yep! Learning music theory feels so good once you start realizing how everything ties together like that
have fun!