#1
I'm considering taking up piano and possibly the theremin... Would these help with understanding music theory on guitar?

Also, what's the best way to learn? So far I've been taking classical pieces I know on guitar and transcribing them, and trying to figure out chords and scales and whatnot... Ya know, just kinda freelancing it like usual. Advice?
TOO MANY PUPPIES

Soda sucks.
#5
Piano is a completely different world--believe me, I played it for four years. It will broaden your understanding and horizon musically--it offers a completely different perspective. I think you I should make sure I say that music theory is the same on every instrument--so it will help you understand music theory better, but will not make it easier to apply this to the guitar.
#7
I'm doing exactly the same, except for the theramin. :p So far I've really noticed how much easier and faster it is to understand theory and to work things out on the piano. So yeah, definitely a good idea on the piano. No idea about the theramin though, but I'm sure it'll be an interesting experience :p
#8
Err, for the theremin, I meant to ask if it would help with pitch/ear training.

I also play cello... I don't know if that's relevant or not...
TOO MANY PUPPIES

Soda sucks.
#9
piano = theory heaven. understand to music theory lends well to piano. because piano's arranged just like pitches on paper, going from low to high. and notes are much easier to see. and it's easier to play in higher keys. a limitation of the guitar is you cannot play too a high a flat key (like Ab major, etc). on piano you can do that.
#11
Quote by Firequacker
Err, for the theremin, I meant to ask if it would help with pitch/ear training.

I also play cello... I don't know if that's relevant or not...

Theremin i dunno about... that thing's just weird. piano is good for ear training, cello is FANTASTIC for ear training because you have to have really good relative pitch to really play well and in-tune since it's non-tempered. Work on your ear playing cello, a few of my friends play cello and other string instruments and the ones among them that are really good have amazing relative pitch.
Piano will help with everything, especially chords, intervals, and composition because guitar can make you think inside the box too much sometimes. Only thing better than composing on piano is composing without an instrument in your hands because then there's no instrument to impose limitations.
I'd look for private lessons because lessons help make sure you cover all the bases, especially if the teacher is willing to teach you theory.
#13
Music theory is universal. Also, the theremin is an instrument and not just a toy. It makes notes, just like any other instrument. It will help you musically, especially when it comes to a pitch. (If you're playing it properly.)
#14
a limitation of the guitar is you cannot play too a high a flat key (like Ab major, etc)


...what? Sure you can. It's no harder than any other key.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
I've asked music teachers the same question and they've all suggested I take piano as that is pretty much the standard instrument that theory is taught on.

I have a Yamaha keyboard that's sounds pretty good and wasn't too expensive, so check on them too.
#16
Quote by RustyGold
piano = theory heaven. understand to music theory lends well to piano. because piano's arranged just like pitches on paper, going from low to high. and notes are much easier to see. and it's easier to play in higher keys. a limitation of the guitar is you cannot play too a high a flat key (like Ab major, etc). on piano you can do that.


No key is any "higher" then the other, what are you talking about?