#3
So if i play these notes in the key of C Maj
C-G-|-D-A
is it a consecutive fifth because C to G is a fifth and D to A is also a fifth?

or can it only be C-G-D?
Last edited by RustyGold at Mar 4, 2008,
#5
Quote by GoDrex
those kinds of chords sound great to my ear.


people say you should avoid consecutive fifths because they rob you out of texture because they sound too strong. at least in the olden days they did
#6
A chord containing E B F# is E sus2, which is not a resolute chord; it wants to move somewhere.

Quote by RustyGold
So if i play these notes in the key of C Maj
C-G-|-D-A
is it a consecutive fifth because C to G is a fifth and D to A is also a fifth?

or can it only be C-G-D?
C to G is a fifth and D to A is also a fifth. Playing C G D, G D A, or C G D A would be consecutive fifths.
#7
Quote by RustyGold
people say you should avoid consecutive fifths because they rob you out of texture because they sound too strong. at least in the olden days they did

close, but actually completely false. you should avoid PARALLEL fifths in part writing, which is any two voices have the interval of a perfect fifth (or its octave equivalent. unequal fifths are another matter) in motion. so if there's a four part writing and the bass has c and alto has g and then bass moves to a and alto to d, that's parallel fifths. two perfect fifths in sequence in the same 2 voices = bad. same for parallel octaves. power chords in rock are generally evaluated by their root and the fifth is ignored, because the addition of the fifth with distortion creates a timbre you can't get from a single note.
consecutive 5th chords are very common actually, they form a large part of the normative progression rules. look up pachelbel's canon in d, the bassline is a nonstop consecutive fifths progression (except every other one goes up, but it's the octave up from the descending fifth that would have otherwise occured.). multiple consecutive fifths are perfectly acceptable.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
A chord containing E B F# is E sus2, which is not a resolute chord; it wants to move somewhere.

C to G is a fifth and D to A is also a fifth. Playing C G D, G D A, or C G D A would be consecutive fifths.

I think he means a progression? so a c chord to a g chord to a d chord, etc? sus2 voicings are fun though. the riff of "message in a bottle" is just a bunch of sus2 chords.