#1
I fell in love with the guitar the day i started playing almost a year ago. I started lessons quickly and was immersed in all of the knowledge that comes along with learning this complex instrument. God, I enjoy the theory so much, engineer nerd here. I loved the "Why" as much as the "How".

I was taught all of the basic major scale, chord construction, 12 bar blues, intervals, and basic tab lessons, but now it seems like I have hit a wall. I haven't learned anything new in such a long time theorywise.

Everyday my playing gets better technically. I get a little faster and cleaner at the songs I'm attempting to play and my timing gets a little tighter, but I have stopped learning anything technical completely.

I did switch teachers and the new guy is really into metal just like me and teaches some great technique helps but no theory. I'm just curious what I can move onto now that I have a good deal of the basics down.


P.S. I love to play metal but I love theory too, so anything sounds good to me.
Peavey VK112
Fish&Chips EQ
Ibanez TS9DX
Jackson Warrior JS30 upgraded EMG 81/85
Epiphone Silverburst 1966 Reissue G-400
Washburn D12N

Playing since 03-11-07
........Uber Noob Skillz
#2
Try picking up some music theory books from a local music shop. Check out the columns sections for articles on music theory as well. Learn how to construct chords in a given key/mode, and then build solos around that. Try to incorporate them into your improvisation.

I recommend "The Guitar Cookbook". I don't know the author off the top of my head though.
#3
Quote by VIRUSDETECTED
Try picking up some music theory books from a local music shop. Check out the columns sections for articles on music theory as well. Learn how to construct chords in a given key/mode, and then build solos around that. Try to incorporate them into your improvisation.

I recommend "The Guitar Cookbook". I don't know the author off the top of my head though.


Thanks a ton. I really like book title name drops to check out. The library has such a large section of guitar books.

I originally started to play lead and got frustrated because I didn't go anywhere with it. Now I'm digging on some metal rhythms pretty hard.

I've started to get a little of the creativity bug but am having a hard time transferring that constructively to my playing.
Peavey VK112
Fish&Chips EQ
Ibanez TS9DX
Jackson Warrior JS30 upgraded EMG 81/85
Epiphone Silverburst 1966 Reissue G-400
Washburn D12N

Playing since 03-11-07
........Uber Noob Skillz
#4
Quote by jewbaby667
Thanks a ton. I really like book title name drops to check out. The library has such a large section of guitar books.

I originally started to play lead and got frustrated because I didn't go anywhere with it. Now I'm digging on some metal rhythms pretty hard.

I've started to get a little of the creativity bug but am having a hard time transferring that constructively to my playing.


Don't let your hands write your music, let your mind write your music. When you're inspired after an emotional event, hum the first thing that comes to mind. Then remember it good and well, then pick up your guitar, and pour your soul into the air. That's what music means to me.

But as for lead guitar, don't worry, it's supposed to be technically challenging, but with practice, patience, and a little motivation, you'll get there. You don't need to sweep 6800 notes per second to be good at lead, you just need to lay down a melody that supports the harmony perfectly. Just keep going and you'll get far. Technically, every time you pick up the guitar you get better, even if it's just a tiny, itty-bitty bit of finger strength. Just remember that a lot of practice pays off in the end, and just keep going at it.


EDIT: And no problem man, that's why we're here. That book is great for any genre because a large portion of the book is dedicated to studying harmony and melody.
#5
Modes. You need them, they come in very handy for improvisation, mostly in a jazz context I suppose but you could use it for metal as well. You could look into upper extensions and alterations for chords, especially as they relate to soloing over jazz charts. There I go with jazz again. I know what you mean, I like to play metal too but I feel like after a while, once you reach a certain understanding, metal only really gets more complicated in terms of time signatures. But you should be able to start recognizing certain modes in the metal you play that might give you a greater understanding of how the songs are composed, or why they work the way they do.

Oh, and notation. Learn to read music, it'll give you many more opportunities to play.

Edit: I wasn't privy to the other posts when I was writing my reply. Modes should really help with playing lead, especially if you're improvising. Take it slow (like, it could take years, I've been playing for six and I still have a lot to learn in this regard) and you'll eventually start to get it. And I suggest learning to read notation regardless, though it's another aspect that could take a good bit of practice to become fluent, as it were.
Last edited by janecoffin27 at Mar 5, 2008,