#1
So I'm writing this free form composition for music theory class, having fun with my bass coming up with a slick bassline for the 12 bar blues i i i i iv iv i i V iv i v progression, and I decide to check over the assignment requirements one more time.

"The only restriction is that you demonstrate the conventional use of leading tone seventh chords."

****.

Help! I don't want to trash my entire funky bassline and write something different and I have no idea what I should do. How could I work a leading tone seventh chord in there somewhere and not make it sound ****ty?
#2
i believe that means the dominant seventh chord, which in blues can be your i, iv or v but in theory should only be the v chord. by dominant 7th i mean D7 or watever, not Dmin7 or Dmaj7, D7. At least i think thats wat that ^ means
i dont think it means use the 7th chord from the scale, that would be a min7b5 chord, and wouldnt sound great with a 12 bar blues

EDIT: yeah leading tone 7th is definetly a dom7 chord. Leading tone would be your 1 chord so say its in A major u hav to use A7 in it sumwhere
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#3
Quote by druz15_UG
i believe that means the dominant seventh chord, which in blues can be your i, iv or v but in theory should only be the v chord. by dominant 7th i mean D7 or watever, not Dmin7 or Dmaj7, D7. At least i think thats wat that ^ means
i dont think it means use the 7th chord from the scale, that would be a min7b5 chord, and wouldnt sound great with a 12 bar blues

EDIT: yeah leading tone 7th is definetly a dom7 chord. Leading tone would be your 1 chord so say its in A major u hav to use A7 in it sumwhere


Dominate refers to the 5th (V) degree of the scale and leading tone refers to the 7th (vii) degree. Dominate 7ths are V7 chords and leading tone 7ths are vii7 chords.

And yes, I know it might sound ****ty, but I don't want to trash all my hard work.
#4
I GOT IT. Stick it wherever it seems the least out of place for the amount of time a 64th rest would take.

I don't know, I wish I could help more...
#5
Dominate refers to the 5th (V) degree of the scale and leading tone refers to the 7th (vii) degree. Dominate 7ths are V7 chords and leading tone 7ths are vii7 chords.

And yes, I know it might sound ****ty, but I don't want to trash all my hard work.


Yes i know, i do theory, what im trying to say is the LEADING note 7th will be the tonic played as a dominant 7th.
Theoretically, thats not right because the tonic (the 1 chord) should be a maj7 chord BUT heres the thing, blues is a tricky genre that doesn't adhere to the musical "rules" of theory, it is full of dominant seventh chords, which shouldn't be there, but they sound good, so blues musicians kept them there.

So if you're doing a chord progression, you CAN use the dominant 7th for the tonic. If it were another style, using the maj7 chord would also demonstrate use of a leading 7th.

But hey, wether im right depends on what the person who gave you the assignment meant, you should ask them. It could just mean using chords with a seven in them eg min7 maj7 etc etc
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#6
Leading tone 7th chords would generally be diminished 7ths (basically coming
from the vii7 of the harmonc minor). It ought to be pretty easy to fit into your
progression: just approach the I, IV or V chord from a 1/2 step below with a
diminished 7th. Alternatively, you can just approach from a 1/2 step below with
a dom 7th chord (this would basically just be a slide up). I think that would quailify
for what's being asked and it's a very common blues device.
#7
Quote by druz15_UG
Yes i know, i do theory, what im trying to say is the LEADING note 7th will be the tonic played as a dominant 7th.
Theoretically, thats not right because the tonic (the 1 chord) should be a maj7 chord BUT heres the thing, blues is a tricky genre that doesn't adhere to the musical "rules" of theory, it is full of dominant seventh chords, which shouldn't be there, but they sound good, so blues musicians kept them there.

So if you're doing a chord progression, you CAN use the dominant 7th for the tonic. If it were another style, using the maj7 chord would also demonstrate use of a leading 7th.

But hey, wether im right depends on what the person who gave you the assignment meant, you should ask them. It could just mean using chords with a seven in them eg min7 maj7 etc etc


I assume, by your post, that you mean the "Leading tone 7th" in the key of C would be C7, which isn't correct. The leading tone 7th is a chord built off of the major 7th interval of a key (the major 7th being the "leading tone"). If the chord is a triad, it is diminished, and if it is a 7th chord, it is generally half-diminished in a major key, and fully-diminished in a minor key. So, in the key of C, we build the leading tone 7th off of B, and we would probably have either Bdim or B half-diminished.


I think of leading tone 7ths as dominant substitutions, with the root resolving up a half-step to the root of the tonic. If your blues is in Cm, you could precede any i chord with a B fully-diminished. You could also precede the iv or V chords with their respective leading-tone 7ths, but these would be secondary leading tone 7ths.


edg, I do like the idea of a dominant 7th built on the leading tone, but if I was the teacher I don't think I'd accept that as a substitution
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#8
Well, you could sub the IV for a viiø. It would be a tritone sub, which is pretty common in jazz and blues music. That way, it'll still FEEL like the IV, but it will still contain the leading tone. If you don't know how to do it, an easy explanation would be replacing the lowest note in the IV chord (assuming the root is in the bass) with the leading tone of the key. This seems like the easiest way to do it.
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#9
Quote by 6DgOfInTb
Well, you could sub the IV for a viiø. It would be a tritone sub, which is pretty common in jazz and blues music. That way, it'll still FEEL like the IV, but it will still contain the leading tone. If you don't know how to do it, an easy explanation would be replacing the lowest note in the IV chord (assuming the root is in the bass) with the leading tone of the key. This seems like the easiest way to do it.


This wouldn't actually be a tritone sub, though, since the function of the IV and the leading-tone seventh are different. The reason a tritone sub works is because the dominant's 3rd and 7th (the tritone that resolves well to the I) are found as the 3rd and 7th of the tritone sub.

A tritone sub for the IV would be a dominant built off of the bI degree (if the key was C, your IV is F and the tritone sub is built on Cb), and would resolve to the bVII, and you'd probably be in the key of the bVII.
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#10
^Yeah, you're right. I was thinking about the V, and explaining as the IV, if it were dominant. Thanks for clearing it up
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#11
never mind me i read the initial post wrong
*sigh* such a waste of typing
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