#1
hey guys,im just a bit confused about this,i hope you can clear it up for me

suppose im soloing in the A major scale,now i know i can jump to the B dorian scale and use it,also same goes for the C# phrygian scale...etc

but,is that all there is to it?cuz i kinda think they all have the same sound when i use them that way,they all sound like A major,only on different parts of the neck,whereas i think each mode has its own feel and sound to it and i wanna utilize that

so,do i practice both things?the feel of each mode seperately,and how to use other modes to play it on different positions of the neck and different ways?

sorry of thats a noob question.im a bit confused..thanks in advance
#2
they should have the same sound. They all use the exact same notes.
for example if you're playing in A major, and you move up to B dorian or C# Phrygian, you will be playing the exact same notes in a diferent position. That's actually the entire point of the modes.
Last edited by rush5757 at Mar 5, 2008,
#3
What you want to do is play alternate modes of A; pick which one to match the chords you are using and the sound you want. I think the lessons section has a good explanation of all the modes, so you might want to take a peek there.
#4
Yeah, modes like you are using are exactly the same scale in different positions.

What you've got to try and do is play different modes, such as playing A Ionian (major), then shifting to A Aeolian, for example. Thing is, ideally you'll have chords underneath which better get specific modes over the top to sound better.

Check you youtube, i'm sure i've seen a great vid with Joe Satriani explaining it all!
Adam
#6
The problem is you're moving to A major each time.
Move to A Phrygian or A Dorian or somethign, Dave Weiner is doing his "riff of the week" on modes at the mo, they may help.
#7
when to use modes depends on the chord or bass note
you can go along with the progression changing positions, or you can stay in the same position while changing modes (tonal center)

if playing solo then you usually use the modes to play things in octaves repeating patterns...things sound nicer when they are repeated instead of just randomly going all over the place. look into melodic patterns, it's used a lot in classical music for teaching
#9
Quote by adzlee123

What you've got to try and do is play different modes, such as playing A Ionian (major), then shifting to A Aeolian, for example. Thing is, ideally you'll have chords underneath which better get specific modes over the top to sound better.



yeah he is right. the way you are doing it is just moving the A scale around the neck, to change modes you have to change the key centre not the root note, for example going from A ionian which obviously is in the key of A, to A dorian which is in the key of G. you get nearly the same scale just with a different number of sharps and flats depending what mode you choose.
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