#1
I kinda bounce around a bit so pelase bear with me.

When I first got the Samick guitar in my sig, it was in need of some serious adjustments; the main one being the nut height. So I took the locking nut off and filed the wood down a bit. But, when I went to put it back on, I found out that one of the screw holes was stripped out and the screw wasn't catching.

Some people have told me that it's no big deal but it really bugs me and I'd like to get it fixed. I googled for awhile and most of what I found (non guitar related repair sites) was people cramming the hole with wood glue and toothpicks and then redrilling a hole to screw it into.

Does anyone have any experience with repairs like this? Is the toothpick idea sufficient? It seems a bit, half-baked in IMO.

A Samash <shudders> 'technician' said I should be able to drill the hole out larger and tap in a wooden dowel and then drill into that. Although that's better than the toothpick thing IMO, I don't really like the idea of enlarging that area much larger especially being so close to the fret board and risk cracking the maple.

After frequenting this forum a bit, I noticed that glue mixed with saw/sanding dust was used for fillers in various areas of the guitar. Maybe this would be better?

I'd like to get some ideas or confirmation of the above ideas before I risk doing something that i can't reverse.

Thank you for your wisdom in advance.
Guitar:
Dean Vendetta 3 - Dave Mustaine Livewires

Amplifier
Carvin X100B - Bias Mod - Tungsol 12AX7's - JJ KT77's

I have built the most badass 212 that puts all others to shame
#2
use a match stick instead of a tooth pick and it will be fine
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Antisocial Behaviour Order. A chav's equivalent of GCSEs.
#4
1) get a match
2) dip it in PVA glue
3) indert it into the hole
4) snap off the head
5) put screw in
6) there is no 6, its that easy
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#5
The toothpick method will work.
Fill the hole with wood glue, stuff as many toothpicks as possible into the hole, clean up the excess glue, let it dry, break off the excess toothpicks, drill a pilot hole, and voila!
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#6
It seems like the toothpick/matchstick thing works pretty well for most people. But is this a temporary fix, or will I be able to reinstall the screw later in the guitars life without having to redo the fix?
Guitar:
Dean Vendetta 3 - Dave Mustaine Livewires

Amplifier
Carvin X100B - Bias Mod - Tungsol 12AX7's - JJ KT77's

I have built the most badass 212 that puts all others to shame
#7
The threads might get stripped again, but it's still the same fix. It's a very easy job.

The dowel method would probably be a little more robust.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#8
This actually just happened to me today too, however mine ripped out during a swing. As you can guess, my guitar is not too happy with me. I got a nice dime size chip in the back and a few dents/indentations on the neck.

I think I'm personally going to use the dowel rod method of things, just because it seems cleanest. Hopefully though, I won't have to enlarge the whole and I'll just get lucky with a good sized dowel rod that'll fit perfectly first shot.... or is it smarter to use a larger dowel rod?
#9
The purpose of the dowel method is to get rid of the old hole, and give you a fresh slate for the hole. Toothpicks just un-strip the hole, so to speak.

Besides, chances are the closest thing you can stick into a hole like that would be a little wooden skewer, which is about the width of a wooden match.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#10
hmmm... I know my local craft stores carry very thin dowel rods but I'm not sure what kind of wood they're made out of. The dowel rod method seems useless to me if it's not the same or a harder type of wood than whatthe necks made of. If i can't find any decent rods that will do the job right, I'll end up doing the toothpick method. Figured it can't hurt. my experience is that usually "quick fixes" end up making the product pregressively worse and worse but I don't see how that can happen with this even if i do have to redo it after awhile.

Great advice guys!

Thank for all your help.
Guitar:
Dean Vendetta 3 - Dave Mustaine Livewires

Amplifier
Carvin X100B - Bias Mod - Tungsol 12AX7's - JJ KT77's

I have built the most badass 212 that puts all others to shame
#11
liquid nails! worked for me!
Quote by Spoony_Bard
Dude I got these strings the other day that couldn't be tuned to higher than 4 octaves below middle C then I realized that they were shoelaces and they weren't making any sound at all.
#12
the toothpick idea is excellent. it works, and who cares if its half-assed, no one is going to know that you did that. as long as it works.
Peavey XXX combo *upgraded screen resistors, Tung-Sol's, and 6L6's*
Schecter Syn Std. * modded, scalloped, and worn*
Schecter C-1 Elite *still sexy*
Ibanez AEL 12-string

"He who sticks his dick in peanut butter is fucking nuts"
#13
this started with my custom strat, what i did was i took some tooth picks and wood glue and stuck broken up toothpicks and wood glue into the hole packed it nice and tight then i screwed the strap button back in. Now its tighter than ever the screw doesn't move at all either.
#14
When my straplock ripped out of my basswood body (soft wood) I dabbed some Gorilla Glue on the screw and put it back in. I let it dry for several hours... and chances are good that thing will never fall out again.

Just a little bit of glue will fill in where the threads were... so it may be possible to remove the screw later. If I spin it with a screwdriver, it will most likely break the glue free and come out. (but the hole will be stripped again)

Not the best option, but the easiest option. Doesn't require any special skills.
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