#1
is there any way to get the bass guitar to be more noticeable on a recording?
i know it all depends on the speakers and sub's defintly get it in your face, but im recording on sunday at a top notch studio. the amp i'll be using is a eden wt800.
i know i'll probably record my bass lines 4 times. 2 times with a different tone.
1 treble tone and one really in your face low bass tone.
if this should be in the recording part of the forum, lemme know and i'll gladly transport there.
#2
some kind of effect, maybe?
if not that play something that is out of the ordinary of the guitar play but still fitting right in the pocket

(see working man by rush)

But since you seem to just be a bout recording i guess i am of no help. sorry.
#3
Quote by Crazy Horse
some kind of effect, maybe?
if not that play something that is out of the ordinary of the guitar play but still fitting right in the pocket

(see working man by rush)

But since you seem to just be a bout recording i guess i am of no help. sorry.



actually, that really did help. it gave me alot of inspiration.
i havent listend to rush in forever =]
#5
It's all, all, all about the EQ. New strings and the like also help, but the EQ decides whether or not you're heard.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#6
EQ/Compression are gonna be your main methods to stand out in a mix, does your studio time come with an engineer or is someone in your band going to be engineer? A good audio engineer should be able to easily make the bass stand out in the mix, I assume if you are at a top notch studio you will have a top notch engineer and he should be able to help you get everything set so he has something to work with.

Good luck
#7
update.

i recorded today, eevrything sounded pretty good.
what i did was just direct input because the eden wasnt really cutting it.
i just told the mixer guy? to give me2 different tones, bass with abuttload of mids and treble with a buttload of mids.
annnddd, it gave me kind of a as blood runs black kinda sound.
like how you can hear the bass in the backround of there songs but then you can't.
anyway, everyone finished recording today except our vocalist because he's sick so were going to finish the song in about a week or 2.

www.myspace.com/officialskyonfire

^ if your going to take the time to listen, please only listen to "let's play hangman"
all the other songs are just bleh.
#8
Well just a word of advice (something I picked up on the Warwick forums) is that punch/growl will help you cut through the mix as we all know, and the more expensive Warwick heads have a knob just for "growl." I heard it's set to 250Hz... so in the future, you could try boosting 250Hz to get a punchier tone. Just a thought, I've never tried it.
2006 Warwick
MASTODON
#9
Quote by gywo copta
Well just a word of advice (something I picked up on the Warwick forums) is that punch/growl will help you cut through the mix as we all know, and the more expensive Warwick heads have a knob just for "growl." I heard it's set to 250Hz... so in the future, you could try boosting 250Hz to get a punchier tone. Just a thought, I've never tried it.


250Hz boosts in recording aren't a brilliant idea. Low-mids are often taken down in a recording to make everything clearer.

I know you've already done your recording, so all I can give you now is a little 'for the next time' advice.

Firstly, how your amp is set tone-wise won't have a great effect on the final tone, because bass is usually EQ'd mercilessly for each song to get separation (along with most instruments).

I think DI was a good choice, because it is clean and you get good signal, however, often the amp will be recorded as well for versatility purposes. A blend of the two can get very good results.

With amps, mic choice is crucial. If your amp is deficient in some frequencies and excessive in others, tell the engineer and he can choose a mic bases on evening it out. Even a blend of mics can be a good thing. AKG D112 is a great mic for catching the low end and you can use that in conjunction with a gritty guitar mic for the mid-range like a Shure SM-57.

But like mentioned earlier, compression is going to be your best friend in the studio (unless you play every note the same loudness as the other like a machine). Basically, it reduces the dynamic range of a sound, so the difference between the loudest and softest notes aren't so big. That way all of the quiet notes sound louder.

The other big thing is stereo image. Bass tends to stay in the middle (along with lead vox). The reason bass stays in or around the middle is because it takes alot more energy for speakers to reproduce low frequency sounds, so middling shares the strain equally.

Therefore if less stuff is panned in the middle, it won't be as cluttered and will increase the perceived audibility.
#10
DI and mic the bass...
Quote by hightension01


Tell her
"I could be playing this *inserts Job For a Cowboys Doom Cd*
but i'd rather play this *inserts *David Crowder followed by Brewster*"

haha yeah that should work


Quote by Aqua Dementia
richrawr FTW!
#11
Let the engineer do it. Setup a good tone you like and record that. The engineer can tweak whatever in post if some instruments need to come out more. Hopefully your producer knows when to bring what instrument above the rest.

And id depends on the music you playing to an extent. If you just following root notes with the guitarist then it's one of those things where you can't distinctivly hear the bass but you know when its gone kinda thing.
Quote by zonic



i do alot of chording (and i mean alot)
#12
Quote by fleaflicker182
250Hz boosts in recording aren't a brilliant idea. Low-mids are often taken down in a recording to make everything clearer.

I agree with that statement, but I think 250Hz is a bit too high in the low-mids to make that kind of impact. Personally, I take down at around 150Hz to make my tone clearer, but found that I needed to make around 250Hz flat in order to still have some warmth. I have mine set up -3db 150Hz +0db ~275Hz to get a clear, warm low end. Set treble to please.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..