#1
hey all...

i've been trying to understand the basics of a dual solo...but i haven't found anything to help me out...

what normally sounds the best? when the first guitarist is playing the solo...should the second be playing the 5th's of the note...an octave higher? 3rd's?

how do you all play?
#2
5ths always sound good and are probably the easiest to play but 3rds always sound better since it gives a darker sound. however, they're more complicated to come up with. octaves don't really work that well for soloing in my opinion.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
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#3
It's up to you to decide how you want it, you choose the way you want it to sound. If you're doing a sad, slow solo, you might want to harmonise it in thirds: second guitar plays the same part a third higher in the scale that the solo's in. If it's in A minor, he'll play a C over the first guitars A, because C is the note a third above A in the A minor scale. He'll play a D over a C, a B over a G...
But you can also have a counter-melody, with the second guitar playing something different than the first.
#4
Quote by zObiPhiOn
It's up to you to decide how you want it, you choose the way you want it to sound. If you're doing a sad, slow solo, you might want to harmonise it in thirds: second guitar plays the same part a third higher in the scale that the solo's in. If it's in A minor, he'll play a C over the first guitars A, because C is the note a third above A in the A minor scale. He'll play a D over a C, a B over a G...
But you can also have a counter-melody, with the second guitar playing something different than the first.

that's what tony iommi from black sabbath did
Originally Posted by evening_crow
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#5
Ha, this is quite a coincidance, i've just spent a very fustrating hour recording just now. Ive been asked to compose a rocked up version of an old scottish bagpipe tune for a friends wedding and I'd thought id add a harmony of the main melody in the refrain to "cheese it up". I usually write dual guitars in diatonic thirds, however, for this perticular tune, it sounded very 'middle of the road', so I used a mixture of different intervals whilst keeping the diatonic thirds as a basic outline.

My advice is to treat the harmony as a melody in its own right. Record the lead melody and play it back (repeat as many times as needed) and play over it till you get something you like. Dont be afraid to experiment with different intervals for certain notes.

Also, remember that you dont have to harmonize every note. A few pedal points under the melody can work wonders.
Last edited by kidcasino at Mar 6, 2008,
#6
If the harmony is just a single diatonic interval all the way, it will most likely get a bit boring. What intervals you use isn't a big deal, what does matter tho, is that once one part is established as the higher part, they probably shouldn't really cross over too much, and the interval between the 2 parts shouldn't really change by more than a 3rd in a single note change. The lead/melody can cross between the two parts as the pitch requires. It doesn't always have to stay in key, but if it's going out of key all the time it will sound a bit weird.

PS just to get pedantic on your arse, it's not really a 'dual solo', but a lead 'for two guitars' or just a duet.
#7
to me harmonizing in anything aside from 3ds or 6ths sounds horrible
3ds is the best though