#1
Title pretty much explains it. Should i do something i enjoy and will probably do well at ie: go to music college. Or should i go to oxford and do economics and become a rich investment banker.

????
#2
i think it all comes down to choice ;rich and bored, or happy and skint, id rather go to music college n be happy n skint
#3
Oxford...you pompous bitch.

It's obviously your decision, but you will always be able to play your guitar for fun. However, you will not always be able to earn decent money from it, let alone enough to support a lavish lifestyle. But, if you're good at economics, you will have good work and earn good money.

And you can always play for fun.


AND..........you can minor/double major/take classes in music while pursuing an econ degree!
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Oxford...you pompous bitch.

It's obviously your decision, but you will always be able to play your guitar for fun. However, you will not always be able to earn decent money from it, let alone enough to support a lavish lifestyle. But, if you're good at economics, you will have good work and earn good money.

And you can always play for fun.


AND..........you can minor/double major/take classes in music while pursuing an econ degree!


Yeh i realise im being a bit cocky with oxford. Im just trying to show the two extremes. Il probably get into a fairly good uni, and become fairly richs. But hey lifes a bitch.
#6
Go for the econ degree first (or whatever) and then, yes, you can always play for fun. Worst case scenario: you get a good job, make a nice bit of money, and if you feel that you still want a music degree you can get one as well instead of just having the music degree and still be paying it off years down the road. I was sorta in the same situation as you, I actually went for film first, hated it, so I'm finishing my music right now (I changed majors) and am finishing off my final prerequisite for electrical engineering and am starting that degree in the fall (hopefully).
#7
^There's nothing wrong with pursuing a "normal" job while retaining a passion for music.

I've met plenty of great musicians and asked them what they do for a living. One of them was a ligitimate pro. The others were doctors, lawyers, businessmen, stuff like that. And the "normal" ones still enjoy music.
#9
If i were you i would get my economy degree. After completing, get your music degree and stay in music. If nothing is working for you in the music buisness you'll always have another way out without any trouble. you'll be able to make money in noo time
#11
Do something you'll enjoy. That said, you haven't told us whether you would enjoy working in investments/economics, etc. Some people love that stuff.

I was in a similar boat, trying to decide between music and accounting. The thought of working by myself in a cubicle wearing a suit and tie was way less appealing to me than the prospect of getting a degree in music and then going to teachers college.

Ironically, I'm currently teaching grade 7+8 instrumental music and hating pretty much every blessed day of it. By comparison, the teaching jobs that I have had that don't focus on music (ie. classroom) I have loved.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
just follow, your ego man.
Quote by killedbyaspork
because there is also a gibson squire, and they don't want to get them confused
#13
go to oxford first, become sad and rich, then when your rich hire someone to learn guitar for you.. boda bing boda boom, case closed
#14
you should probably be asking yourself why you want to be a musician.

do you want to do classical or contemporary? do you enjoy creating music, or do you just play covers? do you learn songs by ear, or do you find tabs?


if classical, you would need a good teacher, and it would help do be experienced a little so you can tell if you have the drive to keep learning it. this is a very difficult thing to get in to. you already have 'the greats' and many many great great not as known guitarists. when you're limited to playing other people's music and using skill and interpretation as the only differentiation between you and a billion other people, you've got a tough vocation in front of you.

if you just like to play covers and solos i would highly recommend looking other places. i'm not saying this is a road to know where, you could be a session guitarist or play in some cover band or just find a band that the parts are there for you...but being in a band like this is a temporary job.

if you like creating, make sure you are creating original things. it doesn't matter how fast you play or how well you can sound exactly like x band's recording. it's all about creating, layering ideas, production ideas, and then putting it all out there. without school those 3 things can be a hard thing to keep doing because we can't analyze what we're doing and what your influences are doing so you can build up from there. a band from my college dropped out and became big...that's great for a couple of years...but ultimately they're stuck in a rut of the playing the 'same' music.

hard critical analysis, music theory, recording, creating...that's what makes a contemporary music major.
Last edited by jomarkdave at Mar 7, 2008,
#15
Quote by nugiboy
Title pretty much explains it. Should i do something i enjoy and will probably do well at ie: go to music college. Or should i go to oxford and do economics and become a rich investment banker.

????


Hmm...I see...my inner guidance counselor says: a MUSIC BUSINESS major might suit you. Here's my advice - Get your liberal arts done at Oxford, cross the ocean, get your classical theory and repertoire at Julliard while spending summers in Paris, Austria, and Seville cuz they have nice guitar conservatories, pick-up some nice contemporary music at Berklee, and then you can get a master's in business at Harvard or you can do that at Oxford too. You're ALL SET! good luck!

Seriously, my goal is to be a performing musician with business interests within the music industry. And so far, I think my education decisions are going well...it's because I like music and money(ill-bed fellows indeed). But most importantly, even if I were to become heavy into the business aspect of it, as long as you are around musicians, you will always be inspired, and you will always have the choice to go 100% music when that middle-age crisis hits.

Like going into a uni with a strong music program AND a good liberal arts/business program would probably be your best bet. You don't need to carve things in stone...yet.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#16
Unrelated to music, an investment banker likely would not study economics in college, but rather finance. Economics is actually incredibly mathematically involved, much more than most people would expect. There's lots of advanced calculus and algebra that would wouldn't think of. Finance may be the same, but I don't know as much about it.

I'm not sure I'm right about this, so if you choose to become an investment banker, make sure you talk to college advisors before you base your life on what I've just said.
#17
Quote by Nick_
http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=27722

Make sure you read that first.


Anyway, whatever you decide to do, make a decision and stick with it. Life's too short for indecisiveness.


that's an insane website. Thanks alot!
#18
Well, what are your goals? If you think you might want to teach on the university level in the US, the way things are going these days, you'll need a master's degree in music at the very least. Some schools are even requiring a doctorate now. The schools that don't require at least a master's are very few and far between, and I don't see the trend reversing any time soon.
Brevity is the soul of lingerie.
-Dorothy Parker
#19
Quote by Nick_
http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=27722

Make sure you read that first.


Anyway, whatever you decide to do, make a decision and stick with it. Life's too short for indecisiveness.



I think that sums it up pretty well, I would say much of the same thing... to kind of recap..

If you have the money readily/cheaply available (rich parents, full scholarship, etc) then go for it... most people don't have that luxury, so if you don't, you are probably better off in the long run going to school for a career that is a bit easier to make a good living off of. While you are pursuing that degree/career/trade, continue to practice music and if possible take music classes along with your other classes.

Really you only need a degree in music for 2 paths: Professor or Music Business...

No one needs a degree to be a rock star, so if that is your musical goal, you can get all the same knowledge and experiences without the $40k/year tuition fees as long as you motivate yourself and look around.

I was strongly considering going to Berklee for many years, but after investigating it fully I determined it wouldn't be worth the price of admission and from what I observed, most of the graduates from there end up teaching music somewhere which isn't really what I'm going for.

In the end I still haven't gone back to school, but I plan on auditioning for a degree in theory/composition at UNT(North Texas) in another year or two.. it is kind of an expensive school as well and as you see on that link, has one of the best jazz programs in the country, but being a resident of texas & denton county it is a much cheaper option for me and my career in IT/Development is making me enough $ that I will be able to pay for most of it without getting loans(I'm 25 now).

Hope that helps you out some with making a decision.
#20
Quote by chillbeast

In the end I still haven't gone back to school, but I plan on auditioning for a degree in theory/composition at UNT(North Texas) in another year or two.. it is kind of an expensive school as well and as you see on that link, has one of the best jazz programs in the country, but being a resident of texas & denton county it is a much cheaper option for me and my career in IT/Development is making me enough $ that I will be able to pay for most of it without getting loans(I'm 25 now).


That's crazy, I'm moving there this summer and planning on audition for UNT's Vocal Performance program/composition. I'm not quite sure if I could get in... if not, I will attend the local music college (in Gainesville) to buff up on my theory/guitar/vocal skill and then go for it again, perhaps for composition.
#21
Quote by Paquijón
That's crazy, I'm moving there this summer and planning on audition for UNT's Vocal Performance program/composition. I'm not quite sure if I could get in... if not, I will attend the local music college (in Gainesville) to buff up on my theory/guitar/vocal skill and then go for it again, perhaps for composition.



Awesome bro, good luck to you.

From what I've heard from other students, it's not THAT hard to get in, you just need to be fairly competent on your instrument and have a solid grasp of most of the basic theory elements. A good essay and a solid audition are key from what I understand.

I know personally I've got a ways to go before I nail a solid audition....

What college in Gainesville is it? just the local CC?
#22
Investment banking is a very stressful job. We're talking 90-100 hour work weeks being normal and several overnighters a month not being uncommon. The pay is great, but it doesn't leave much time for a family or anything else.

If you really want to go into something that will make you rich I suggest working at a hedge fund. Possibility to make more money than an IB is definitely there and it's less strenuous.
#23
Speaking of UNT, Jeffrey Snider, the chair of the vocal studies department, is a regular on the New Forum For Classical Singers (www.nfcs.net). He's always very helpful. He might be a good person to ask for advice. He should at least know who in the music college would be best person for the OP to talk to.
Brevity is the soul of lingerie.
-Dorothy Parker
#24
[quote="'-LeG[A"]cY-']We're talking 90-100 hour work weeks being normal and several overnighters a month not being uncommon. It's certainly more than just 9-5, but 90-100 hours is more than a resident (doctor in training) works, and even some of their time is spent on call, so they might not even work the full 80 hours.
#26
Quote by chillbeast

Really you only need a degree in music for 2 paths: Professor or Music Business...



Also teaching - even for elementary school.

Also, a lot of government grants (like Canada Arts Council here in Canada) are available only to classical and jazz musicians who have degrees in music. So, as a classical or jazz musician, you can apply for these grants which help to subsidize your tour and walk away with more money at the end of it.

If you want to get into various facets of the business end of music, ironically, a degree in music won't get you very far. Entertainment law = law degree. Otherwise, you're looking at management-type jobs, administrative jobs, etc., where a degree in some sort of business studies is far more beneficial.

A lot of people (most, even) who work at record companies don't have degrees. They got there through a combination of enthusiasm and developing relationships and connections. The old 'start in the mail room and work your way up' kind of deal.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#27
Quote by axemanchris
Ironically, I'm currently teaching grade 7+8 instrumental music and hating pretty much every blessed day of it.

Is Grade 7-8 the age of pupils or their skill level?

I finish my music degree in about 7 weeks and i'm considering teaching, but as a profession it isn't really calling me. I'd like to get a few more years under my belt on the piano and have two instruments to my name, because i doubt guitar alone would get me much work.
To be honest i'm ready for a break from music at the minute, 3 years of academic study has sucked the joy out of it for me.
#28
Quote by bangoodcharlote
It's certainly more than just 9-5, but 90-100 hours is more than a resident (doctor in training) works, and even some of their time is spent on call, so they might not even work the full 80 hours.


I'm not saying every week is that long but there are sure quite enough of them to make it a terribly strenuous job. Hedge funds are where it's at.
#29
The cold hard question is.... are you actually any good musically? No point chasing an un realistic dream and scuppering another financially more secure career. If you are... go for it. I went to GIT best thing I ever did.
#30
Quote by Chris_Sleeps
Is Grade 7-8 the age of pupils or their skill level?

I finish my music degree in about 7 weeks and i'm considering teaching, but as a profession it isn't really calling me. I'd like to get a few more years under my belt on the piano and have two instruments to my name, because i doubt guitar alone would get me much work.
To be honest i'm ready for a break from music at the minute, 3 years of academic study has sucked the joy out of it for me.


I know how you feel. When I finished my degree, the last thing I wanted to do was to pick up my classical guitar and play. I really appreciated the opportunity to take a break from it. Sadly, that break has been about 13 years now. I'd like to get back into it, but with teaching and the family and the band, there just isn't time.

Go into a school and volunteer. I know it takes time, but it will give you a first-hand look at what the lay of the land is and will give you a good idea if that is really what you want.... or not.

In Canada, grade 7+8 represents 12-13 year-olds. Typically, they start instrumental music in grade 7, so they are beginners. Although, some of them have a prior background in recorder from grade 4, 5, or 6.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#31
Quote by RichieJovie
The cold hard question is.... are you actually any good musically? No point chasing an un realistic dream and scuppering another financially more secure career. If you are... go for it. I went to GIT best thing I ever did.
oh cool. How was GIT? i think it's relevant to the TS too.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#32
GIT was cool.

It was a good spring board for more learning, gave me a good indication of what level the best are. Sit in a room with Jennifer Batten and PG and you lose your ego pretty quick.. Some round here might benefit from that. It certainly gained me a few jobs in the UK in various acts and allowed me to tour most of the world.
I give it a thumbs up.
#33
Quote by RichieJovie
...and allowed me to tour most of the world.
Pics or it never happened. kidding...niiiiiice.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#34
Dude, what are your goals as a musician? If you want to play professionally, then it will take a huge commitment and you should follow through on it. If you have any doubts, then just go to Oxford. You can play your guitar anytime and as a bonus, you will be able to afford any new guitar you want.