#1
Hey guys i want to start a a home studio, I have about $600 and have a few things to start with such as
*Computer
*Amp
*Guitar/Bass
*Small Stupid Drumset
*Some Pedals for FX

I Need to know what else i can use on my budget such as Mics, Preamps, Speakers, Mixers, ect.
Can you guys help me out?
Guitars:
Ibanez UV777P
Ibanez RGD2127FX
Ibanez RG3120TW
Ibanez RGD7321
Ibanez RG6003FM
Ibanez SA160
Jackson Slatxmg3-7
Amps:
Baron Custom Amps K88
Rivera Knucklehead TRE
Fryette Sig: X
Randall RM4 /w Modded modules
Cabs:
Mesa 4x12
Bogner 4x12
Peavey 4x12(K85s)
#2
I recommend u get a Line 6 toneport ux2

It's got 2 mic ins guitar, amp models and download kristal audio.

Get a shure mic


use ur amp as a monitor
and get some good headphones
#3
i reccomend a large smart drumset
My Gear
Yamaha Pacifica (D'addario Flatwound)
Roland Cube 60 watt
Dunlop Crybaby Wah
Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi
Boss RC-2
Montana Acoustic Guitar(Martin Regular)
#5
Quote by meanmrmustad
I recommend u get a Line 6 toneport ux2

It's got 2 mic ins guitar, amp models and download kristal audio.

Get a shure mic


use ur amp as a monitor
and get some good headphones


and pick up a decent set of computer speakers to use as monitors for mixing purposes. do you have a macbook?if so it's real simple to record cause garageband turns out pro stuff very easily....check out my profile. all that is recorded through the line 6 pod xt live (usb connection to mac) with drum loops included in garageband
#6
Some type of PC interface with multiple inputs would be up your alley. Something like the M-Audio Delta 44 (about $150) assuming your PC has a free PCI slot to install it in. Comes with Ableton software.

If you want to mic your amp I suggest a Sure SM57 (about $100) and a cheap preamp like the ART Tube Studio (about $50).

Or you could get a budget mixer, like the Yamaha MG102C (about $150) and lose the preamp.

Looks like you have everything else you would need to put your ideas to track.

DS
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Last edited by Death-Speak at Mar 6, 2008,
#7
Fostex R8 Tape Machine: $200-$350


JoeMeek JM27 Condenser Mic, stereo pair: $100-$200


M-Audio DMP3 (Or alike): $200-$300


And then get yourself a mixer Mackie 1604-VLZ3 perhaps? Only $900
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#8
Quote by sowhat360
and pick up a decent set of computer speakers to use as monitors for mixing purposes.


Never underestimate the importance of good monitors. It is worth saving up for something good. You want something flat. The ubiquitous Yamaha NS-10's (the ones with the white cones you see in a lot of studio photos) are probably the most boring speakers out there. That's why people like them. I use Yorkville YSM-1's. Also very flat.

The problem with regular stereo speakers, and with computer speakers is that they are 'tuned' to add extra bass and treble response, because most pop music and movie soundtracks are perceived as sounding "better" when you boost the bass and the highs. The consumer demands it, so the manufacturers comply. It's good business.

Using speakers like that is akin to trying to paint a picture wearing yellow tinted sunglasses. Sure, putting the glasses on makes everything look funky and brilliant.... but pleasant as it might be, it IS distorted. So, you paint your nice little nature landscape through these yellow lenses and it looks awesome. Take the sunglasses off and..... whoa! What happened there? That doesn't look like what I was painting!

Same with those speakers. Flat and uninteresting is what you want. Anything else will be misleading and cause you to do all sorts of weird things with your mixes. You know how many threads you see about "My mix sounded wicked in my home studio, but when we played it in my buddy's dad's car, the bass was way too boomy" Number one answer on the board is not using proper monitors to mix with.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Actually, the NS-10s were notoriously biased in the mid-range and sounded awful unless your mix had the "disco smile," an EQ emphasis on bass and treble. Pro masterers/mixers recommend using multiple speakers, not just the flat and boring ones, to ensure that your mix sounds good on cheaper systems. The only equivalent of the NS-10 not made by Yamaha now is the Auratone Mixcube. Again, this should be a secondary monitor choice...

Good luck finding a good cheap flat speaker with good definition, especially on the low end...Emusician did review the Blue Sky 2.1 and said it was quite good ($300), though they recommended the use of EQ.

In any case, a good firewire interface like the Presonus Project should give you enough inputs for the drumset, and it's exactly $600 new (try eBay for less). Get a SM57 for the amp and vocals. This package could be a good starting point.

You may want to get a specialized drum kit set of microphones...Samson's a very good brand in my experience. Of course, if you can get separate microphones for the kick, toms and cymbals, than that's obviously better. Rode's NT5 series are very good for overheads.
Last edited by Fast_Fingers at Mar 8, 2008,
#10
Well maybe i should save up more because i want to get good quality recordings in a little studio. I have a decent sized room to use and possibly a little expansion of room in my basement to record Vocals. what do you guys think.

Edit: btw i already have a nice set of sound proof Yamaha headphones so that could come to good use
Guitars:
Ibanez UV777P
Ibanez RGD2127FX
Ibanez RG3120TW
Ibanez RGD7321
Ibanez RG6003FM
Ibanez SA160
Jackson Slatxmg3-7
Amps:
Baron Custom Amps K88
Rivera Knucklehead TRE
Fryette Sig: X
Randall RM4 /w Modded modules
Cabs:
Mesa 4x12
Bogner 4x12
Peavey 4x12(K85s)
#11
Yeah, I had a chance to buy a pair of NS-10's and chose the Yorkville ones instead. Part of the history of the NS-10's was the approach that they were generally considered 'average crappy home speakers' and therefore, if mixes sounded good on them, they'd sound good on anything.

I use my Yorkvilles and a cheap pair of stereo speakers. I get it there, and call it a tentative final mix. A couple listens in a couple of cars - which usually works out well - will reveal any tweaks that might need to be made, and we're good to go.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Quote by kylendm
Well maybe i should save up more because i want to get good quality recordings in a little studio. I have a decent sized room to use and possibly a little expansion of room in my basement to record Vocals. what do you guys think.


Sounds good...as long as the room doesn't have bad reverb qualities. Don't forget that recording has all the little accessories you don't think about until it's too late (like cables, mic stands, and probably labels and twist ties unless you want a sea of indiscriminate cables)