#1
I have run into a problem in that I've gotten to an intermediate level, and have learned most of the blatantly obvious stuff, but I have no idea what to learn next. Actually, I don't even know what there IS to learn, although I'm sure there's worlds of things to learn, I just don't know what. If I realize I need to learn something, I can find information on it, but I don't know what to search on. So, is there some kind of list that progresses through a standard skill set, so that you can practice one thing until you master it, then you immediately know what to work on next?

Before some smart ass posts a link to the ultimate-guitar.com lesson archive... are those things in pretty good order? I mean, should you try to learn as many as possible or are many of them very non-standard stuff? I don't know what is typical and what isn't, and many, if not most, of those seem to be all about solo'ing on an electric, and I'm not sure how much of that is applicable to rhythm playing on an acoustic.
Last edited by corndogggy at Mar 6, 2008,
#2
First off why dont you tell us what your strengths and weaknesses are and what you already know. It's hard to advise people on what they should learn when you dont know what they already know!
Professional Mixing available at request.

Everton FC
#3
Spend time mastering the basic techniques before moving onto the advanced stuff.
#4
for me , the best way to figure out anything new is to learning songs by different artists. every guitar player does something different with his /her instrument

like.. someone into punk music , who probably plays rhythm parts and he wants to learn lead stuff. best way is to listen to music that has lead stuff, and try to learn it. and youll for sure pick up something different you didnt learn before.

its all there just look for something new that interests you.
#5
To me the most important skill a musician must have is imagination. . . And yes, it is a skill that improves with much practice. Just throwin' it out there.
#8
Quote by Footzyrama
First off why dont you tell us what your strengths and weaknesses are and what you already know. It's hard to advise people on what they should learn when you dont know what they already know!


I'm mostly a rhythm player. My skill level is around where you would need to be to play Dave Matthews "Lie in our Graves", or "Crash into me" very well:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Puvq5VW7ixE

I can do basic bluegrass pick/strum techniques, can do simple solo's, my pick speed is not quite as fast as Cowboys from Hell by Pantera. I very much lack the creativity to make up my own riffs, songs, chords, etc., so I find it hard to dedicate much time to trying to learn things that will help me there, I do better playing stuff that I can copy.

Most of my playing revolves around being the acoustic/rhythm player for a 200 person church, but my bag of tricks is somewhat limited and I have no idea what I could learn to help me be a better rhythm player. I take weekly lessons, but it usually requires me to figure out what I want to learn then ask my instructor about it. I just don't know what to ask anymore.
Last edited by corndogggy at Mar 6, 2008,
#9
Quote by confusius
Do you know any music theory?

If not, there is a whole new world waiting for you.


I've had 12 years worth of formal lessons with other instruments. I've had so much theory crammed down my throat that it's not even funny. What's sad is that I really don't know how to use most of the stuff I learned. Even things that I've picked up that are more guitar specific, I'm not sure how to actually use them, they only make me better understand why something sounds good. I find it much more enjoyable to just play and mimick other things instead of being a music student like I used to be.

So, I'm not trying to shun theory, but, I've been there, done that, and it didn't help me much. Maybe there's certain aspects of guitar specific theory that would help though, I'm not sure. It's just that when I played piano and was playing crazy hard 7th level classical pieces, I studied all the theory and was still playing like a robot, just playing the notes that were on the page. Theory seems to only help when you are creative enough to make up your own stuff, and if I could do that, I would have done it by now.
Last edited by corndogggy at Mar 6, 2008,
#10
keith richards (rolling stones ) and pete townshend ( the who) are both pretty creative rhythm players.
#12
I couldn't have said it any better than pepsi1187: just sit down and learn new stuff that interest you. That's how I'm still moving on, and even making up some of my own stuff. I get ideas from the music I learn and listen to.
#14
Quote by Dave Keir
What style(s) do you want to play and / or what players do you want to emulate?


1. Dave Matthews / Tim Reynolds

2. Tony Rice (fast bluegrass)

3. Want to be better at solo work, singing while playing rhythm, and nothing else. Campfire playing type of stuff.

4. Want to better be able to do stuff on the fly... so if I'm playing at church and they say "play this song, which I probably don't know, in B flat, right now, ready GO", which does happen, I can pull it off as if I know what I'm doing.
#15
have you tried alternate tunings? not really a "skill" but you can use your skills to play around in open tunings and such to get a different sound out of your guitar
#16
A few times. I really only did it for "my own prison" (drop d) and some Goo Goo Dolls stuff. Kinda cool.
#18
You know Herman Li from dragon force try to mimic him and i imagine you will find some stuff to work on
#19
Quote by confusius
Tony Rice is epic win. Try learning a few licks by him and then incorporate them into your playing.


That's kind of the problem I have... most stuff that I "really" want to do such as Tony Rice licks is way over my head, and I don't know what I can work on in order to bridge the gap. Dave Matthews is usually really simple compared to that stuff.

Really, the way I learn is with riffs and progressions that are recurring all throughout a song. So many things like Tony Rice songs will do a little run that's out of the ordinary and you never hear it again. I have a real hard time learning that stuff for some reason, and I can't really tell what exactly is going on, what techniques are used.
#20
Have you tried "slide" give it a go in open 'G' this will give you a whole new area & a new skill set to learn i.e. banjo chords. as open 'G' is the same chording as banjo.

Also to make up new stuff of your own, intersperce some of the stuff you know (rythm runs etc) from a few songs & mix them together (the true origin of sampling) & viola a song of your own is created. This will at least point you in the direction of what you like & dont & hence give you direction as to where it is you want to be as a player.

Just a thought , maybe you need to get your head out of church (musically speaking) & into some music that would'nt fit if played in church.
Richard

Veni Vidi Vici

Head Drug Tester of Australians FTWclub
PM the_random_hero for entry

Prime Minister of the UG archtop acoustic players club,
PM Keef_is_King
to join!
#21
Quote by Bailean
You know Herman Li from dragon force try to mimic him and i imagine you will find some stuff to work on




Nothing beats an Am7 arpeggio from Herman.
#22
Quote by Dix_Fix
Just a thought , maybe you need to get your head out of church (musically speaking) & into some music that would'nt fit if played in church.


Oh I do, I play Metallica, Pantera, Green Day, etc. Church actually pushes me pretty hard though, as it's kind of "sink or swim"... the other musicians are actually very good and I have to hang with them in front of 200 people twice a week with no rehearsals. Playing at church has actually been making me grow as a musician more than anything else. I'm just kind of running into a wall now, my bag of tricks is running low. I'm at the point now that I need to learn tricks from other sources in order to use them at church, which may be what you're saying.
#23
Exactly corndoggy i was simply saying, in a poor manner, you may need to influence yourself with other mus'os to pick up on some of their stuff. Dont worry to much about "keeping up" as im sure (even in a church band) if you were not up to the mark they would give you the boot. So yeah get some down & dirty experiance, maybe attend a few open mic nights & try & listen to what you like & just front up to the muso in question & straight up ask if it is allright if you meet & learn off them. What can you loose by this approach.
Richard

Veni Vidi Vici

Head Drug Tester of Australians FTWclub
PM the_random_hero for entry

Prime Minister of the UG archtop acoustic players club,
PM Keef_is_King
to join!