#1
Hi, I'm a complete newb. I only got my guitar the other day, and have no previous experience of playing.

I've read in places that "the money spent on a proper set up will be the best you'll ever spend on your guitar" and such, saying that a properly set up guitar will be much more playable, and easier to learn on etc, less likely to get discouraged.

I'm pretty sure the dealer I got it from didn't touch it, just had it in a warehouse and shipped it, so it's the Epiphone factory setup, that's shipped from China and sat in a warehouse for a bit.

Altho it has a QC sticker on the back, not sure if that's the UK distributor or from the factory, but whatever.....

How bad is the setup likely to be?

I can't actually play anything, at the moment I'm just learning chord patterns and basic strumming, am I better off leaving the set up until it would benefit me more? (and I have the money for it), or should I just get it out the way now?
#2
Have the strings changed out, have it re-intonated, and have the action adjusted as well.
Gear:
Ibanez RG7321 Seven String
Epiphone Iommi Signature SG
Digitech Scott Ian Black 13
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#3
Save it for later. As long as you don't have any fret buzz or major intonation issues, it's fine for now.
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#4
Quote by Dog454
Have the strings changed out, have it re-intonated, and have the action adjusted as well.

Pretty much do this...

Until your good and sure your into this, you don't need an amp....but if you start gettin bored, AFTER you have learned enough to play a song or something (even without a solo) you could get a small cheap practice amp to have fun with.
#5
Being an Epiphone, it could be anywhere from total crap to perfect. If you have an (older) friend who plays guitar (like someone who's a fairly experienced guitarist and actually knows stuff) have them play it and let you know. If the intonation is off or anything of the such then maybe, but getting setup without it needing any modifications is pointless.

Set up doesn't mean actually ready to be played, it means set to your preferences. Some guitarists couldn't care less, others like myself sit there with a centimeter ruler measuring to the millimeter across the neck. It's personal preference. Play for now, and if something sounds funky, have another guitarist look at it.

Quote by Green RATM Day
Pretty much do this...

Until your good and sure your into this, you don't need an amp....but if you start gettin bored, AFTER you have learned enough to play a song or something (even without a solo) you could get a small cheap practice amp to have fun with.

What does an amp have to do with getting a guitar setup?

Oh, and it's an ELECTRIC guitar. It's pretty dull to play without at least SOME amplification.
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Quote by Chad48309
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Originally Posted by The_lizard_king
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I don't think that's the correct use of the phrase "going mad."
#6
It depends on the guitar (not how much you paid), your preferences, and the guitar tech.

Most factory setups can be improved upon, which can make a guitar sound better and play like a dream. Some people like low action, which can make the guitar easier to play.

Lower action, however, increases the likelihood of buzzing caused by the string hitting a high fret. This depends on how straight the neck is and how level the frets are.

Bring your guitar to a few stores and ask questions to evaluate the tech. The quality (or lack of) their answers is one way to find a good guitar tech.
#8
Quote by BrianEschbach
QC stands for Province of Quebec, that I know because I live there


Er, no, it doesn't. It means Q uality C ontrol. Means the guitar was inspected at the factory and passed.
#9
Not sure how amps relate to this thread but I'm using a POD 2.0 with headphones at the moment, but If I thought there was a chance I would give up I wouldn't have spent any money on any of this, don't worry about that mate!

I'm picking up a royal 8 amp on Saturday actually, the place i'm picking it up from (coda music) actually has a good guitar tech from what I can tell and that's where I was gonna have it set up, and was thinking if I did it now it could save me an extra journey as well, if I put my guitar in when I pick up the amp.

Any fret or neck work, intonation etc that needs doing he can/will do, I was thinking to have the action lowered and it restrung with 9 gauge strings to make it easier to learn on.

There isn't any buzzing at the moment, and the neck looks pretty straight to my eye looking down the neck, from the bridge, altho I guess I wouldn't really know what a straight neck looks like yet.

I dunno, I guess since I'm going to have it done eventually, now's probably a good time to do it then.

Also, I thought that maybe the QC was done in the UK, because I've seen pictures of the back of headstocks that said 'QC done in China' or some crap, but i'm not sure if those were the fake Epiphones the pictures were from, or what (but can't imagine they would put the wrong sticker on there after the pain they go through to fake the guitar)
#10
Quote by LeftyDave
Er, no, it doesn't. It means Q uality C ontrol. Means the guitar was inspected at the factory and passed.


Turn your sarcasm detector up.

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#14
Without looking at the guitar, it is hard to say. If you want to be safe, I would get it set-up. Actually, a lot of guitar techs will look at the instrument for free to assess repair costs. One of them might look at it for you and tell you whether or not it needs a set-up (assuming it is someone that won't just say yes in order to make money, but most of the ones I met are pretty cool about stuff like that).

Just because it doesn't have fret buzz, doesn't necessarily mean the set-up is good. I have one guitar I need to get a new nut for because the grooves on the nut are too deep now and it buzzes on the first fret, but it is pretty playable if I don't use open strings. On the other hand, a guitar with the action set all the way up as high as possible is probably going to be pretty unplayable (for most things, there are some things where a high set up is better), despite having no fret buzz.
#15
Damn, I still can't decide, and I have to take it in a minute if I'm gonna. It will cost £30, and then if any work needs doing like fret dressing or whatever, that's gonna cost more.

At the moment i'm just learning chords and stuff, i'm not really playing anything, I won't have any time to give to the guitar until June really, maybe I should do it then.
#16
Don't listen to the people saying have your strings changed by a professional. If you can't change your own strings theres no help for ya there bud. Sorry to sound harsh but its true. Everything your going to have to learn to do yourself eventually. You don't wana end up having to go to a shop every time you need something set up.

Of course unless theres something seriously wrong with it or the truss rod needs an adjustment, everything else you can do yourself. Just research.

Guitars:
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-Schecter Hellraiser C1 (18v)
-Ibanez XPT707FX (Blackouts)
-Ibanez BTB 400 Bass

Main Amp: Mesa DR Roadster

#17
Yeah, I aint gonna go and pay someone to change my strings when I can just google that, or following some extreme act of retardation get a friend to do it.

The idea behind getting the guitar set up for me was to check that there weren't any problems, with the neck and frets etc that need a professional tech to fix.

Guitars that you buy from shops have been looked at by staff and inspected. Guitars.co.uk offer a 'premium service' when you order from there where for £25 they do the same check and set up, and they say they end up sending back 10% of the guitars to the manufacturers because of problems.

It is after all a cheaply produced guitar manufactured in a sweat shop and shipped across the world, then sat in a box in a warehouse for 9 months before I ordered it from the internet.

Getting the strings changed and action lowered is just a convenient part of that set up that they do, i'm only worried about any problem with the guitar that I just spent a ****load of money (to me, anyways) on, especially if it's one that could hamper my learning.

But I didn't bother in the end, i'm gonna wait till I can play a bit and it effects me more, i'm too much of a cheapskate and I'm too busy to play the guitar for more than an hour or 2 a week until June, so I'll do it then.
#18
Quote by Haha, Crackhead
Save it for later. As long as you don't have any fret buzz or major intonation issues, it's fine for now.

i tend to lean toward this advise^. factory set-ups are usually ok( + or - 10%).
what i would do, is the next time you need strings, take the guitar with you, when you go to purchase new strings. if you buy strings, and a few other things, they will often install them for almost nothing, if not free. they will notice if anything is out of whack, and correct it. this will only work, if the store is not too busy. so try to go in "off" hours. and btw, if you play everyday, you'll need to change strings at least once a month. my guitar player changes his, once a week.


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#19
Well, I never got my Epi set up, and it just cracked. I got it about a week ago also. So, yeah you might want to get it checked.
#20
oh **** drummer, thats harsh man...

I'll get it looked over and set up in June when I start to learn for real.

Why do you need to change the strings after playing them a certain amount, they just get worn and start to sound ****? Harder to keep in tune?