#1
Rush specifically has a very distinct sound. I think there must be some certain "prog rock" scale that sounds this way.

Am I right? What's the most commonly used scale in prog rock?
I'm looking for a tab of The Marshall Plan, by Blue Oyster Cult, and of Mario Minor, by Powerglove. If you have one please PM me.
#2
Good God.

You need an indepth knowledge of every scale and mode you can possibly think of, and the ability to play it all over the fretboard in every key. You'll also need to be able to construct every chord you can think of on the spot, in any inversion, and be comfortable in odd time signatures.
In short, learn some damn theory. There's no magical scale that will make you sound prog.
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#3
Prog is too broad to generalize with just a few scales, and in some cases the sound comes from a fair bit of modulation, so one scale simply wouldn't work.

A better thing to do would be to learn a bit about chord progressions and the different functions of chords, and then analyze songs that you like to figure out what is going on with the harmony.
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#4
haha, yea that's pretty funny.
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#5
O_O

I guess I should have known.
I'm looking for a tab of The Marshall Plan, by Blue Oyster Cult, and of Mario Minor, by Powerglove. If you have one please PM me.
#7
My thoughts to answer your question before even opening the thread:

Absolutely everything you know, everything everyone else knows, everything you don't know, and everything nobody else knows.
#8
Lol, alright. Thanks anyways, guess I need more theory.
I'm looking for a tab of The Marshall Plan, by Blue Oyster Cult, and of Mario Minor, by Powerglove. If you have one please PM me.
#9
Prog can't really be classified like that.. it's just a mush-mash of different genres. And different bands have different mush-mashes and therefore the guitarists from different bands often use different sets of scales.
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#10
the best way to get your own distinctive sound is to do what nobody's ever done before or something that isn't usually done. SOAD and lotsa metal band play in weird ass tunings, Rush has the weird timing of songs and combination of band member,s which is why they sound great.

What i do is i mix styles and play in keys that nobody does

so my tips are:

-Make up your own tunings
-learn all your scales and modes
-Try offset times, like 7/6 or 5/4, i like 5 /4
-mix different styles
-start messing around and invest in some good effects, i'd go for individual pedals, i've got a crybaby 95Q and a Yamaha flange and it's great for playing a whole mess of styles
#11
Prog is Progressive. Sticking to one scale will mean no progression.
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#12
Quote by J.A.M
Prog is Progressive. Sticking to one scale will mean no progression.


Pretty much sums it up.

Progressive rock/metal is pretty much defined, as a genre, by pure difficulty. This does not mean playing riffs that are faster than possible, shred for example is not the essence of progressive metal. Progressive rock/metal is the complete opposite of most music and because of this it is what most theory based musicians aspire to. You have to learn pretty much everything you possible can to be a progressive musician.
#13
Quote by AgentWiggles
Rush specifically has a very distinct sound. I think there must be some certain "prog rock" scale that sounds this way.

Am I right? What's the most commonly used scale in prog rock?


Rush's sound has less to do with what scales Lifeson used, and more to do with the style it was played with.

I know he used all the same commonly used scales that can be found in most popular music.

minor
minor pentatonic
major
major penatonic
harmonic minor

and probably some others... but those I know for sure.

Learn some Rush. Focus on the style of it... not just the scales. Following formulas for what defines the style wont really cut it. it might give you some ideas, but your going to have to explore the style yourself, and develop your own opinions about it.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 13, 2008,
#14
Quote by Oleh R
the best way to get your own distinctive sound is to do what nobody's ever done before or something that isn't usually done. SOAD and lotsa metal band play in weird ass tunings, Rush has the weird timing of songs and combination of band member,s which is why they sound great.

What i do is i mix styles and play in keys that nobody does

so my tips are:

-Make up your own tunings
-learn all your scales and modes
-Try offset times, like 7/6 or 5/4, i like 5 /4
-mix different styles
-start messing around and invest in some good effects, i'd go for individual pedals, i've got a crybaby 95Q and a Yamaha flange and it's great for playing a whole mess of styles


Hwuh?
#15
Quote by GuitarMunky
Rush's sound has less to do with what scales Lifeson used, and more to do with the style it was played with.

I know he used all the same commonly used scales that can be found in most popular music.

minor
minor pentatonic
major
major penatonic
harmonic minor

and probably some others... but those I know for sure.

Learn some Rush. Focus on the style of it... not just the scales. Following formulas for what defines the style wont really cut it. it might give you some ideas, but your going to have to explore the style yourself, and develop your own opinions about it.


YYZ's solo is in phyrgian dominant. I think it was YYZ.
#16
Quote by Avedas
YYZ's solo is in phyrgian dominant. I think it was YYZ.

Yeah, I believe you're right, it's got a really exotic sound.
Call me Batman.
#17
Quote by Avedas
YYZ's solo is in phyrgian dominant. I think it was YYZ.


Actually its V of Harmonic (5th mode of Harmonic minor).... Ive seen it written as "double harmonic major"

If you know your E harmonic minor and play it over B7 - C ... thats the sound.

anyway thats one RUSH song. A majority of their songs use standard scales.

so the point was..... its not the scales.... its the style.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 14, 2008,
#18
Quote by AgentWiggles
Lol, alright. Thanks anyways, guess I need more theory.
I just think you worded it wrong. You should of just asked: how can my playing sound more like Rush?
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#19
Quote by AgentWiggles
Lol, alright. Thanks anyways, guess I need more theory.


well if you want to sound like Rush, you just need to learn some Rush songs. Theory will help you learn about music.... but you can learn how to sound like Rush, with or without it.

Quote by KryptNet
I just think you worded it wrong. You should of just asked: how can my playing sound more like Rush?


+1
shred is gaudy music
#20
Actually its V of Harmonic (5th mode of Harmonic minor).... Ive seen it written as "double harmonic major"

What do you think the "Dominant" in "Phrygian Dominant" means?
Call me Batman.
#21
Quote by J.A.M
What do you think the "Dominant" in "Phrygian Dominant" means?


I know what it means. I dont use the term phrygian dominant.... I just never learned it that way. At school it was simply referred to as V of Harmonic. But I can see why you would call it that as well.
shred is gaudy music