#1
When using a tube amp on clean mode, cant you get a semi-distorted sound by turning the clean knob all the way up??

if yes, than whats the od used for? extra boost?
kinda makes me think its like a Solid state (which im 99.9% its not)

Also, when you have the standby switch, do you flip on the ON button, then standby? then after the tubes are warmed up flip down the standby?

Palomino V32 btw
Last edited by esp1234 at Mar 6, 2008,
#2
Yeah, you CAN get a distortion on the clean channel of a tube amp by cranking the preamp volume, but it's a different kind of clipping from the overdrive channel.

Oh, and yes to your question about the standby switch.
#3
Yes, tube amps are supposed to distort at high volumes. That's how you get the best sound. The OD channel is if you need more gain, and no it's definatly not a solid state. As for the standby, I have the standby on befor I turn it on, then have it on standby again befor I shut it off.
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#4
The other questions were answered.
Overdrives are used to coax some extra distortion out of it, and to add some dirt at low volumes.
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#5
Cranking a clean channel will result in pure poweramp distortion like AC/DC did with their cranked plexis. The overdrive channel is preamp gain at lower volumes but blends with some poweramp overdrive when at high volumes. Both kind of overdrives together is really something amazing to be heard!
#6
Yes to the clean question.

No to the SS.

OD is for more gain, and situations where you can't crank the volume to OD the tubes.

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#7
Quote by classicrocker01
Yes, tube amps are supposed to distort at high volumes. That's how you get the best sound. The OD channel is if you need more gain, and no it's definatly not a solid state. As for the standby, I have the standby on befor I turn it on, then have it on standby again befor I shut it off.



I think you are turning your amp on wrong. you need to turn the power on first then after it warms you turn the standby...
Quote by RetroGunslinger
this is like comparing a flushing toilet to a hole in the ground
#8
Quote by fifer
I think you are turning your amp on wrong. you need to turn the power on first then after it warms you turn the standby...

I always believed you use the standby to warm the tubes up before you turn it on?!
Last edited by littlephil at Mar 7, 2008,
#9
Quote by littlephil
I always believed you use the standby to warm the tubes up before you turn it on?!


I dont think so...I know that for my AC30cc2 I need to turn the power on first and then turn the standby switch.
Quote by RetroGunslinger
this is like comparing a flushing toilet to a hole in the ground
#10
I have a friend who has been playing for years longer than I have, and he's always turned his Bluesbreaker's Standby on, then turned it on. btw AC-30cc, nice
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#11
You usually will want the amp to be in standby when you fire it up. Get the tube heaters going for about a minute or two and then start jammin.
#12
standby is exactly what it says, the amp is "standing by" waiting for a signal to hit the powertubes, the switches can just be labeled differently on different amps. Sometimes it's STANDBY/ON, Standby ON/OFF, etc. Doesn't matter how the switch is labled, it does the same thing. You want the amp already in standby mode when you turn on the actual power. This way, the whole amp powers up, but you will not hear any sound, as no signal is being sent thru the powertubes yet. Once the tubes have heated to a sufficient temperature, you take the amp out of standby mode, and the signal is sent to the powertubes so you get sound.
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