#1
A power-chord is played like this, right? (Not that I don't know how to play them.)

x
x
3 (little finger)
3 (ring finger
1 (index)
x

But I've seen people playing them using only there index and little finger (not noobs), do they press down two notes with their little finger then? Or just one and skipping the note on the G string in the example above? I'm just curious, seen tabs displaying power chords with only two notes also.
#2
your right homer.
Quote by killedbyaspork
because there is also a gibson squire, and they don't want to get them confused
#4
They can do that, or by omitting the ring finger note you can play an 'octave chord' - the same note one octave up. Listen to MCR's 'I'm Not Okay' - the intro is just octave chords, layering the same note.

Also, power chords come in two or three note varieties - adding the extra string adds more power behind the chord, but also makes the chord more dominant. Depends whether it's meant to be powerful or quiet. Experiment - it's a matter of choice.

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#5
You can play them both ways.

3 (little finger) A#
3 (ring finger) F
1 (index) A#

Its still 2 notes, the root and 5th.


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#6
Quote by HomerSGR
A power-chord is played like this, right? (Not that I don't know how to play them.)

x
x
3 (little finger)
3 (ring finger
1 (index)
x

But I've seen people playing them using only there index and little finger (not noobs), do they press down two notes with their little finger then? Or just one and skipping the note on the G string in the example above? I'm just curious, seen tabs displaying power chords with only two notes also.


A power chord is made up of the 1st and the 5th notes in the Major Scale. In the example that you posted, the index finger plays the 1st (root) note and the ring finger plays the 5th. That, by itself, is a power chord. The little finger in your example actually plays the same note as the index finger (the root note); this gives the power chord a fuller feel to it, but it does not create a new power chord.

And most people that you see playing the power chord with only two fingers are playing the root note with their index finger and the 5th with their ring finger (or the 5th and the added root note with their ring finger).
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#8
Quote by stephen_rettie
the little finger is just playing an octave its not essential


Yeah, now when I'm thinking about it both (the index and the little finger) plays A# in the one I had as an example.

*Edit: Thanks for all the answers!
Last edited by HomerSGR at Mar 7, 2008,
#9
ive seen threads like this

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#10
Quote by FourSticks17
...And most people that you see playing the power chord with only two fingers are playing the root note with their index finger and the 5th with their ring finger....


I think that way is weird, it feels totally wrong for me now and it did that when I started playing too, but everyone has his own way of playing.
#11
Some people actually play power chords with only their index and pinky fingers. I only do that when playing the "octave" chord, but do whatever feels comfortable to you. The way you have it written is most comfortable to me, so thats how I usually do it.
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#12
you can play them any way you want, any way you feel comfortable it doesn't really matter.