#1
I don't see why there is a such thing as 6/8 and 12/16 when really it all means that there is 3 beats per bar. Can someone explain this to me?
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#2
im pretty sure theres no difference, its just how its written in the music. technically it is 3/4, but when you listen to the song youll be able to tell the difference.
im not too sure if im right though
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#4
Quote by guylee
it's for when things are too fast and you wouldn't be able to count all the beats fast enough if it were in 3/4

Yes, They are conducted differently in an orchestra or concert band.
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#5
in the time signature the top number is beats in the measure and the bottom number is what type of note gets ther beat for example 6/8, 6 beats in a measure, and the eigth note gets the better. I guess it's used to make things sound different than written and spice things up
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#6
All wrong.

3/4 is three quarter notes to a measure. The quarter note gets the beat.
6/8 is two triplets (3 8th notes in each) to a measure. The dotted quarter note gets the beat.

3/4 is simple time. 6/8 is compound time. Look those terms up on google/wikipedia or ask me to explain them if you need further knowledge.
#7
3/4 is simple time, 6/8 is compound time.
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#9
^ Yeah, that's the most right answer so far.

EDIT: to bangoodcharlotte
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#10
6/8 is generally two beats of three eighth notes each. Its would be more like a 2/4 bar with triplets on each beat than a 3/4 bar.
#11
^That's exactly what it is. 3/4 and 6/8 are ABSOLUTELY NOT the same thing. We talk about meters as if they are fractions, but they aren't actually fractions.

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^ Yeah, that's the most right answer so far.
Only "most right?"


Seriously, though, is there some kind omission or slightly inaccurate statement in my post?
#12
Agree with bangoodcharlotte. I'll just add what cleared it up for me. 4/4 is not a fraction. It is not math. The best analogy I can think up is money. If you have ten dimes or four quarters they both add up to one dollar, but they're not the same thing. If you have four quarters in your pocket it would be wrong to say you have ten dimes in your pocket. Somewhat, but that's the best I can think up.
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
6/8 is compound time.


Yeah, they're conducted differently. And 9/8 is also a compound time sig, yet, I like to use it without making it a compound signature. Is that against the 'rules'?
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#14
Quote by bluesrocker101
Yeah, they're conducted differently. And 9/8 is also a compound time sig, yet, I like to use it without making it a compound signature. Is that against the 'rules'?
How do you use it, 2/4 and 5/8?

My understanding of writing music is that you do whatever makes it the easiest for someone reading and performing your song to understand.
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
How do you use it, 2/4 and 5/8?


Yeah pretty much. 1 extra 8th note thrown into your typical 4/4 bar.
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#16
I've done that before. I just write it in 9/8, changing the PT notation so it's a group a 4 8th notes (or 2 groups of 2), then a group of 3, then a group of 2. I did it among a bunch of 4/4, though.
#17
Quote by bangoodcharlote
All wrong.

3/4 is three quarter notes to a measure. The quarter note gets the beat.
6/8 is two triplets (3 8th notes in each) to a measure. The dotted quarter note gets the beat.

3/4 is simple time. 6/8 is compound time. Look those terms up on google/wikipedia or ask me to explain them if you need further knowledge.
This is the correct answer. Regular meter and compound meter are not the same because in the musical piece the PHRASING changes. Phrasing is what gives a piece it's feel, it's cadences, it's form. Thus something in subdivided time though in "theory" they are the same, it will be an entirely different piece because of the way it is interpreted, thus played, thus sounded, thus felt. Read: it'll sound different.
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#18
3/4 and 6/8 are totally different.... downbeats in bold.

3/4 = 1 and 2 and 3 and 1 and 2 and 3 and etc, you tap your foot 3 times a measure.
or 123456

6/8 = 1 and a 2 and a 1 and a 2 and a 1 and a 2 and a etc. 2 beats per measure.
123456

5/8 = 12123... or 12312

7/8 = 1212123 or 1231212

9/8 = (most commonly) 123123123, like a 3/4 in triplets. but can be like 121212312 also, but very rarely.
Last edited by coffeeguy9 at Mar 7, 2008,
#19
It's kind of hard to explain, but:

3/4 time you probably know, ONE two three ONE two three ONE two three...

6/8 time is like, 4/4 or 2/4 time, but every quarter note is divided into triplets.

ONE two three FOUR five six ONE two three FOUR five six.

You use one and four as downbeats usually, and when you make it go faster, 6/8 time sounds like 4/4 time with triplets.

You learn to get it sooner or later; it's kind of a "feeling", rather than a technical definition.
#20
Quote by bangoodcharlote
All wrong.

3/4 is three quarter notes to a measure. The quarter note gets the beat.
6/8 is two triplets (3 8th notes in each) to a measure. The dotted quarter note gets the beat.

3/4 is simple time. 6/8 is compound time. Look those terms up on google/wikipedia or ask me to explain them if you need further knowledge.


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#22
Quote by coffeeguy9
3/4 and 6/8 are totally different.... downbeats in bold.

3/4 = 1 and 2 and 3 and 1 and 2 and 3 and etc, you tap your foot 3 times a measure.
or 123456

6/8 = 1 and a 2 and a 1 and a 2 and a 1 and a 2 and a etc. 2 beats per measure.
123456

5/8 = 12123... or 12312

7/8 = 1212123 or 1231212

9/8 = (most commonly) 123123123, like a 3/4 in triplets. but can be like 121212312 also, but very rarely.


I always figured that
3/4 was 123123 (in 2 measures)
and 6/8 was 121212 (in 1 measure)

Or is what I'm describing not downbeats but something else?
OR perhaps I was taught wrong?
#23
I always figured that
3/4 was 123123 (in 2 measures)
and 6/8 was 121212 (in 1 measure)

Or is what I'm describing not downbeats but something else?
OR perhaps I was taught wrong?


3/4 would consist of three quarter notes per measure (or six in two measures, as you said)
6/8 would consist of two dotted quarter notes per measure (a dotted quarter note consisting of three eighth notes), which would look like: ONE two three ONE two three. There's no reason you couldn't subdivide it differently, but I'd be very careful about calling it 6/8, since it very nearly always functions as a compound time signature and people are going to expect it to be broken down in the way I described above.
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#24
Its like fractions, it can be simplified down.
6/8= 3/4
Many musicians only use 4/4 now a days.
6/8 can also mean 3 quavers in a bar.
so.. 1-2-3- 1-2-3-
and so on and so forth.
Last edited by hugh20 at Mar 8, 2008,
#25
i hate threads like these. everyone feels like they need to answer.

first post should have been "google mofo, do you use it?"
#26
Quote by hugh20
Its like fractions, it can be simplified down.
6/8= 3/4
Many musicians only use 4/4 now a days.
6/8 can also mean 3 quavers in a bar.
so.. 1-2-3- 1-2-3-
and so on and so forth.
This is absolutely wrong. Please don't post in this forum if you don't know the correct answer, unless it is an opinion-based thread where there is no correct answer.

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#27
Quote by bangoodcharlote

Seriously, though, is there some kind omission or slightly inaccurate statement in my post?

I don't know why i said "most", that's completely right.
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