#1
Hokay.

so.

I'm Building a 2 x 12" speaker, using FUCHS specs (any reccomendations otherwise?).

- 20" high x 26" wide x 11" deep

fairly standard, decent, compact, as far as I'm concerned. The site says theirs is approximately 55lbs. , which is not an issue whatsoever.

my question for all you (speaker) wiring junkies is:

Advantages to wiring in certain ways:

Option 1) 8-ohm circuit
---> 2 - 16-ohm speakers in parallel

VS.

Option 2) 16-ohm circuit
---> 2 - 8-ohm speakers wired in series


- What are the benefits of having a 16-ohm resistance versus an 8-ohm resistance?
--> Is there a Volume difference?

- I've seen switchable resistances on 4x12 cabinets, which disengages/changes the circuit from 16-ohm to 8-ohms, would this be possible for a 2x12 as well?
--> How would I do this?
----> DPDT switch (or something of the like?)

much thanks for the help in advance, I know you guys will be all over this, and I'm sure there's a simple Answer to this that I'm not seeing.

------

Jake

**EDIT:
I have read through the Wiring and building tutorial.
------

Shwiggity.
#4
thump...

sorry, I'm really looking for some help here guys, my dad's asking to make sure we're not doing anything too out of line.
------

Shwiggity.
#5
Youll need to match the impedance of your amplifier.The lower the impedance the more flow of power.You put a 4 ohm speaker with an 8 ohm amp itll strain the amp.You put a 16 ohm speaker on a 8 ohm amp , itll strain the speaker.It will not work its full potential if you mismatch impedances.
#6
Hey,
My suggestion is this:
Get two (preferably different) 16 ohm speakers and wire them in parallel.
Here's why:
If one of the speakers happens to go bad, you still have the other speaker as a load so you don't blow up your amp (as opposed to series, where you suddenly have no load at all if a speaker goes).
Then, you can wire a switch in the back if you like to turn off one of the two speakers. Then you have a 16 ohm speaker, still within the range of most amps' range (you can even switch between one and two speakers if you like without changing the impedance on your head, if it's originally set for 8 ohms). You could even make a three-way switch to turn on left speaker, both, and right speaker if you like.
That's the setup I have with my amp (one Weber blue dog, 50W/one Weber Silver bell, 50W. The switch turns off the silver bell)

There's not really a volume difference between series and parallel wiring.
Let me know if you need a wiring diagram for your cab and/or the switch to change speakers.
Last edited by Roc8995 at Mar 9, 2008,
#7
^that would be fantastic, I'd appreciate it greatly!

one question, however:

(i'm purchasing from Warehousespeakers.com...)

I'm looking to purchase a Green Beret and a Vetran 30, but the wattages are different on each speaker... "Power Rating 25 watts RMS" for the Green Beret and "Power Rating 60 watts" for the Veteran 30.

any ideas as to whether this should have an impact at all?
------

Shwiggity.
#9
Quote by deftonesordie
bump?


It will have an impact, yes. If you're mismatching wattages like this, it's generally best to do it in a 4x12".
What amp are you using? This will totally dictate how you should go from here.
"Everybody, one day will die and be forgotten. Act and behave in a way that will make life interesting and fun. Find a passion, form relationships, don't be afraid to get out there and fuck what everyone else thinks."
#10
it'll be a Line 6 HD 147, or a Mesa Dual Rec, so it won't be as much of an issue regarding the ohmage, as both are switchable as far as I know. (it's for my guitarists, i'll probably end up building a second in the future) worst case, I'll buy two of the same speakers to keep the wattage even.
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Shwiggity.
#13
As far as I know with PA systems (should be the same with guitar amps) the 4ohms will be a bit louder because it is using the most possible flow of current without a lot of resistance..

However.. A lot of people say you should use the highest impedence available on your head, as it makes your output transformer work to it's full potential which gives you the best tone.. (just what I've read, I'm not saying it does or doesn't, I have no idea)

As for speakers.. You can mix speakers.. but if you do the cab will only be able to handle 2x the lowest rated speaker wattage..

For example if you have in a 2x12 cab.. 1 50W speaker and 1 75watt speaker.. Your cab's safe rating will only be 100W NOT 125W..

The reasoning behind this is that power disperses evenly through all the speakers.. So each speaker will e recieving the same amount of wattage.. So you can only safely input 100W of power into the cab or the smaller 50W speaker will be overloaded and probably blow out.

That should explain what you need to know I think? Did that all make sense?
#14
Quote by TheDev01dOne
As far as I know with PA systems (should be the same with guitar amps) the 4ohms will be a bit louder because it is using the most possible flow of current without a lot of resistance..

This applies to solid state amps, not to tube ones, I believe.

Quote by TheDev01dOne
As for speakers.. You can mix speakers.. but if you do the cab will only be able to handle 2x the lowest rated speaker wattage..?

AFAIK, with guitar amps and cabs, the rated wattages add up.
#15
Let's say i'm only worried about a solid state amp for the time being.

my basic question is, if i were to wire the 25 and 65 Watt speakers in parallel, would there be an issue?

if so/not, would i have to wire in anything special to even/adjust everything?

(aside) would the wiring diagrams for the speaker use that would mimic the Les paul electronic system (L pos.= speaker, Mid pos.= both speakers in parallel, R pos.= other speaker) be used?
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Shwiggity.