#1
So, after reading through the "NAME THIS CHORD" thread, I had one general question:

How do you figure out the chord, based on its notes?

I do know formulas and the notes, but how did you figure out what the root is, and which enharmonic to use?
#2
The enharmonic note depends on the key you're playing in. I'm not very good at explaining things, so I can't help much with explainging how to name a chord. Sorry.
#4

I do know formulas and the notes, but how did you figure out what the root is, and which enharmonic to use?


you don't. There are possible situations where a chord is ambiguous. A sus2 chord for example is just an inversion of a sus4 and vice versa. So it's only in context you can tell the real root note. As for which enharmonics, again you can't know all the time. Normally you fit it into a common way. For example, a major chord you'd normally assume is the I chord of a scale and just play it like that. A 7 chord you'd assume it's the V note of a scale, and so on for 7b5, minor chords, etc.
#6
Quote by capiCrimm
you don't. There are possible situations where a chord is ambiguous. A sus2 chord for example is just an inversion of a sus4 and vice versa. So it's only in context you can tell the real root note. As for which enharmonics, again you can't know all the time. Normally you fit it into a common way. For example, a major chord you'd normally assume is the I chord of a scale and just play it like that. A 7 chord you'd assume it's the V note of a scale, and so on for 7b5, minor chords, etc.



Alright, that makes sense. Thanks for that explanation.