#1
So i usually play the 6 string and ive just "seriously" got into home recording. I am of corse a metal head. So I need
A: A decent, cheap metal "studio" bass.
B: Tips on how bass should work in a metal song(alongside a guitar of corse). Harmonies, rythms techniques ect.
Any and all help would be appreicated. Sorry for the super vague and pretty idiotic question
#2
A: There's nothing classified as a "studio bass", just use what you have and if what u have sucks then just buy a better bass...
B: you could follow everything the guitar does, not just the root notes but everything else (like lamb of god for example)... and try to make a little bass fill thingy in the interludes or breakdowns
#3
i dunno the cort curbow most definately classes as a studio bass.

metal basslines aren't usually very intricate, just backing up what the guitarist is playing
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

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Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#4
A. ANY bass can be a "metal" bass. I've seen Jazz basses, warwicks, spectors, hell, even some crappy Gibson "guitar" basses being used in metal.

B. Metal music is one of bass playings greatest friends, or worst enemies. However, there is no set way. Just do what you feel sounds great. If playing a walking bassline fits the track, go for it. If you need root notes, go for it. If you feel it has to be taken on a huge bass driven journey, go for it.
#6
Ok by studio bass i mean a bass that sounds good on in a typical recording situation E.G. played thorugh computer speakers. As opposed to a live bass, which just sounds good though an amp. I dont want anything flashy with my bass tones. Just a decent backbone if you will. I dont own a bass at the moment thats my problem I play realy weird metal to tell you the truth. It has elements of thrash, metalcore and prog and distorted to all hell guitars. So i dont think the bass would need to have any fuzz. Again sorry bout the vagueness
#7
I think it's fair to say you can't go wrong with a Jazz bass of some kind. The Squier Vintage Modified '70s Jazz is a decent bass for the money, or a used Fender.
#8
i still say the cort curbow. 30 something frets, onboard eq with a preset slap switch, nice and light perfect for a guitarist

and as smb said you can't go wrong with a jazz bass
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#11
Or a DI box, if your only concerned with playing at home, and not band practices etc.
Ibanez SR505
Ashdown ABM 300 EVO II
Epifani UL410
#12
Quote by Blackvelvet
So i usually play the 6 string and ive just "seriously" got into home recording. I am of corse a metal head. So I need
A: A decent, cheap metal "studio" bass.

Ibanez GSR200.
that will give you the sound. but only in the hands of someone, that knows how to play it. i say, find yourself a bass player, for the bass tracks.