#1
My grandfather has a 1962 Fender Precision Bass and I was just wondering about how much it would be. It might be mine after he dies.
#2
Depending on the condition, probably between $5k-$10k USD

Gear:
Fender Standard Jazz Bass
Artec Matrix Pedal Tuner
BBE Optostomp
Boss GEB 7
EHX NYC Big Muff
Ashdown MAG C410T-300
Torque T100BX
GAS-ing for:
Boss SYB5
Behringer Intelligate IG9
#3
electronics are perfect. no like gashes in the finish, but there are alot of cracks because of the wear and tear of playing it for 46 years.
#4
I saw a 1964 P bass go on Aus Ebay for $29 000 a couple of months ago, but this was in beyond immaculate condition.
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#5
Does it have all of the original parts (covers, tug bar etc)? Having all of those intact or missing can impact the price as well.
#6
It is completely original. Nothing has been changed except the strings. It has chrome covers for the bridge and pickup also.
#7
the value could range from $5,500 to $17,000, depending on the color, and condition.
the color is really the most important factor. playing wear does not hurt the basses value. post some pics! i'd love to see it!

Edit:
Fender-
Precision Bass
1962
Slab body, Shell Pink- $13,500 to $16,500
Surf Green - $11,500 - $14,000
Burgandy Mist, Slab- $10,500 - $12,500
Burgandy Mist , curved- $9,000 - $11,000
just a few examples, the list is too large to replicate.
Last edited by 83lespaulstudio at Mar 8, 2008,
#8
I don't have any pictures. He lives in a different city. It's like a olive color now because it's sort of faded; it was like a greyish green color. They used to still make them the same color but they stopped for some reason. I have a friend who has a p bass and another with a j bass that are the same color.
#10
Pics, PLZ!

And wasn't Sherwood Green like... forest green? My buddy has a Squier in that colour. I've also seen a few Strats in that colour as well.

But man, the thought of a slab-body Shell Pink P-Bass is really hot...
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#11
Quote by thefitz
Pics, PLZ!

And wasn't Sherwood Green like... forest green? My buddy has a Squier in that colour. I've also seen a few Strats in that colour as well.

But man, the thought of a slab-body Shell Pink P-Bass is really hot...


well the book doesn't mention "Forest Green", we're talking 1962. and they only had a few greens listed. i'm thinking "olive" to be closer to "sherwood" than "surf" green, as described. and further more! a slab bodied P in Shell Pink would be tha' bomb!
i wish i owned one.
Last edited by 83lespaulstudio at Mar 8, 2008,
#12
Oh, sorry, I meant my buddy's Sherwood Green Precision looked like it was a 'forest green' like colour, but I also found this pic:



TS, is THAT the green you have?

(BTW I never knew there were so many cool custom colours back then!)
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#14
Congradulations, man! That's a fantastic bass, and should easily last at least another 46 years if treated right. That thing was meant to be played though, so don't let it sit around on display unless it's in immaculate condition. If it has normal wear and tear, make that thing sound good
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#15
You know, I'm wondering who among you would keep it and who would sell it. Especially you threadstarter. It's just... I find myself having no idea whether I would rather keep such a beautiful relic... or sell it and get lots and lots of good modern stuff. Such a choice...

...I have to lean toward keeping it.

Oh yeah, by the way, lucky...
Les Claypool
Geddy Lee
Robert DeLeo
Flea

Weileder

...Coincidence? I think not.
#16
I'd keep it because it belonged to my grandfather.
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#17
I'd sell it cuz I hate the feel of P-basses, but I wouldnt waste the money, I'd put it towards something important and permanent to remember grandfather

and Id buy a freakin sweet Rig

which is important and semi permanent
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#18
^nah i couldn't sell a hand-me-down instrument no matter what the quality or price. A gift is a gift (this includes wills), once anything becomes a gift IMHO it should not be sold rather passed on, Play it and remember your grandfather
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#19
I am very very jealous. I would definitely keep it, I love Precision basses and I could not bring myself to selling such a bass with a family history and meaning to it.
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#20
Who wouldn't keep it? I mean, everyone should have a p-bass somewhere in their arsenal and they don't make them much better than the one posted. This isn't even thinking about the sentimental value either.
#21
Quote by thefitz
Oh, sorry, I meant my buddy's Sherwood Green Precision looked like it was a 'forest green' like colour, but I also found this pic:



TS, is THAT the green you have?

(BTW I never knew there were so many cool custom colours back then!)

Fitz what kind of amp is behind that strat? it looks boutiquely awesome...

and i would keep it seeing as it was my grandad's
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#22
Quote by latinosuperstud
Fitz what kind of amp is behind that strat? it looks boutiquely awesome...

and i would keep it seeing as it was my grandad's


That would be a Top Hat amp.
#23
^thank you ... have to look into them
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#24
To the TS, once again, you are quite lucky. I for one would hold onto that bass, for several reasons. One its a beautiful instrument and has a sound that even the reissues can't quite replicate. Two, its a family heirloom and part of your family history. I just find its rather sad when someone inherits something that has been loved and cherished in the family and then is quick to "Roadshow" the value and head off to the auction house.

I've talked to John Swift about this before, but if one of my kids looked to inherit any of my instruments for "monetary gain", I'd be probably be looking to sell it myself at that point, like he did with his vintage Fender. In a way, its a shame that monetary worth has become paramount to family history / sentimental value in so many cases.
#25
i would definitely keep it, and then pass it along, to the family member that showed interest in playing bass. a bass should be played, not collected.
#26
Quote by anarkee


I've talked to John Swift about this before, but if one of my kids looked to inherit any of my instruments for "monetary gain", I'd be probably be looking to sell it myself at that point, like he did with his vintage Fender. In a way, its a shame that monetary worth has become paramount to family history / sentimental value in so many cases.


If it came to that I would look around so carefully for a buyer. I don't think I could sell my bass to just any person. I would have to know it was going to be played.
#27
I'd keep it.

Until I retire.

Then sell it.

Or, if you're financially stable upon retirement, will it to a grandchild or child, in case they are financially unstable. If they are, they'll do the same.

I really think the "I'll keep it even though it could make me and my family financially stable" is a really, really, really silly and unrealistic point of view. Yeah, "the sentimental value is worth more than any dollar amount", whatever the Hell that means, but I think financial security of a family is always more important than any "sentimental value." A huge photograph or painting in a frame on the wall should hold just as much sentimental value.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#28
Well, I mean, if selling the bass gets the family out of debt and back into an apartment, yeah I'd sell it in a heartbeat, but I'm just taking this from the view of an upper-upper-lower-middle-class person.
#29
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Well, I mean, if selling the bass gets the family out of debt and back into an apartment, yeah I'd sell it in a heartbeat, but I'm just taking this from the view of an upper-upper-lower-middle-class person.


So 1 (upper) + 1 (upper) - 1 (lower) - 0 (middle) class. Wouldn't that make you just upper class?
#30
Quote by shut_up_you_***
So 1 (upper) + 1 (upper) - 1 (lower) - 0 (middle) class. Wouldn't that make you just upper class?



No, he means the highest echelons of the lower middle class.
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#31
Quote by thefitz
I'd keep it.

Until I retire.

Then sell it.

Or, if you're financially stable upon retirement, will it to a grandchild or child, in case they are financially unstable. If they are, they'll do the same.

I really think the "I'll keep it even though it could make me and my family financially stable" is a really, really, really silly and unrealistic point of view. Yeah, "the sentimental value is worth more than any dollar amount", whatever the Hell that means, but I think financial security of a family is always more important than any "sentimental value." A huge photograph or painting in a frame on the wall should hold just as much sentimental value.


Fitz, if it became a choice between groceries, mortgage vs. keeping the bass, yes I'd sell it. But for too many people, at least in my generation, its become "how much money is it worth" vs. family historical or legacy value.

I have a few things from my grandparents and great-grandparents that may have some more than decent value. But their value to me is not how much I can get for them at Sotheby's next auction but the stories and people behind the tangibles. With instruments, the personal connection for me is even stronger than say a painting or a piece of jewelry, because it was played by that ancestor.
#32
No. The base is middle class. But I'm not that high so I'm lower middle class. Then I'm not quite that low, so I'm upper lower middle class. But again, I'm not quite that low, so I'm upper upper lower middle class.
#33
Quote by Mongoose87
No, he means the highest echelons of the lower middle class.


But what does that mean? He has a white picket fence, but no back garden? lol

Just teasing... just found that statement hilarious
#35
Quote by anarkee
Fitz, if it became a choice between groceries, mortgage vs. keeping the bass, yes I'd sell it. But for too many people, at least in my generation, its become "how much money is it worth" vs. family historical or legacy value.

I have a few things from my grandparents and great-grandparents that may have some more than decent value. But their value to me is not how much I can get for them at Sotheby's next auction but the stories and people behind the tangibles. With instruments, the personal connection for me is even stronger than say a painting or a piece of jewelry, because it was played by that ancestor.

Yeah, if you are needing for money, and are in the quasi-tetra-lowish-middle-right-wing class, sell it, but I think if this instrument could break the $100,000-$200,000 mark in 40 years, one could buy a retirement condo in Florida while they give their entire house to their current kin. Or, use the money on their family instead of saving as much for retirement. Sentimental value is nice and all, but I think there are many, many more important things at any stage of the game. To me, anyway. Items come and go, but quality of living and financial piece of mind stay with you for your whole life.

EDIT: To paraphrase, I think if you break the 6-figures mark, the sentimental value gets undermined big-time.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#36
dang i wanna see a pic of it!

it sounds great man hold onto it whenever you get it
My gear:
Fender Jazz Bass
Ampeg BA115